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2018
Friday, April 20th
12:45 PM

David Maslanka and a Piece of Our Time

Anna Gilreath, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Deborah Loomer, D.M.A.

Barnes Recital Hall

12:45 PM

David Maslanka was an American composer born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1943. Throughout the broad scope of his varied compositional works, few have captured the stark contrast between joy and despair like his Concerto for Clarinet and Wind Ensemble. This piece has two large movements: "Lamentation," which reflects great mourning and heartbreak for both personal and worldly issues, and "Dance," which is a lively and vibrant look to the future and a new world. Maslanka drew from Classically styled titles and the Romantically styled qualities of expression, along with the technical difficulty and speed, inspired by Franz Liszt and Carl Maria von Weber to create what Maslanka called "a piece of our time."

1:00 PM

“Songs of the Siren”: Mental Health in the Black Community

Victor Pullen, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Mark Lewis, D.M.A., and Tomoko Deguchi, Ph.D.

Barnes Recital Hall

1:00 PM

My musical composition, “Songs of the Siren,” depicts how mental illness affected my life as a young adult. Mental health is a taboo subject when it comes to the black community in America. Any flaws in the brain are seen as negatives or weaknesses, which contribute to the silence in our community. The legacy of slavery, segregation, and racial discrimination helps contribute to the economic and mental disparities of the black community. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, members of the community who live under the poverty line are three times more likely to develop a mental illness. African Americans tend to turn to religion or family when it comes to mental health issues, without considering the help of physicians or therapists due to mistrust and fear. In 2008, Alvidrez et al. conducted a study that showed over a third of African Americans who were being treated for mental health issues thought they would be considered “crazy” within their social circles for anxiety or mild depression. Education and awareness will help the healing process begin, as more members come forward with their stories and suggestions for help. In my composition, each movement depicts the constant struggle between mind and body, with the underlying disease controlling the overall narrative. With this piece, I hope to inspire others to tell their stories and become champions and leaders of a healthier community.

1:22 PM

The Garcia Family and Their Effect on History

Ashley Reynolds, Winthrop University

Accompanist: Lannia Broñola-Dickert, piano

Faculty Mentor: Kristen Wunderlich, D.M.A.

Barnes Recital Hall

1:22 PM

Patricia Adkins Chiti is a very accomplished mezzo-soprano and musicologist. She put together a series of pieces composed by Manuel Garcia, Maria Malibran, and Pauline Viardot. This group of composers is unique for several reasons. In this presentation, I will go into detail about what makes them so unique, as well as why they are very important and pivotal figures in music history. Most singers who are classically trained have heard the name Manuel García. He was a famous voice teacher and vocal pedagogue who was one of the first to discover the science behind the voice as an instrument. In this presentation, however, I will talk more about the famous pedagogue's father, who was more of a composer and singer than his son was. Manuel Garcia Sr. was born in Seville, Spain. He would eventually become a well-known and very talented tenor, composer, and conductor. Garcia Sr. became the father of several musically talented children. Among them were Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. The compositions of the Garcia family were heavily influenced by the belcanto era. This was likely because of all three composers' involvement in the operas of Rossini, Bellini, and Donizetti, who were the three main belcanto composers. The Garcia family moved quite frequently, and because of this, the children were fluent in several languages, including Spanish, French, and Italian. This particular topic for the presentation was picked because I am performing my senior recital in April with pieces from the Garcia composers. I will also have a belcanto set with one piece by each belcanto composer mentioned earlier. It is very interesting to see how the history of the composers and the music all tie together.

1:34 PM

Occupational Therapy for Musicians

Candace Silva, Winthrop University

Barnes Recital Hall

1:34 PM

Although often overlooked, professional musicians can suffer from overuse injuries because of the repetitive positions required to play their instruments. These include, but are not limited to, focal hand dystonia, repetitive strain injury, tendonitis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. While many try to ignore the symptoms to prolong their careers, it only worsens the problem. Occupational therapists can provide treatment for musicians suffering from overuse injuries. Because occupational therapy is focused on using meaningful activities to rehabilitate patients, all treatments are centered on the goal of return to play and any other specific goals the musicians have for resuming their important activities of daily living. This presentation will discuss the specific injuries that affect different musicians (i.e., pianists and violinists/string players), as well as treatments and prevention strategies.

1:49 PM

In The Key of Reform: The Role Martin Luther’s Music Played in the Reformation and Beyond

Brogan Gaskill, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Peter Judge, Ph.D.

Barnes Recital Hall

1:49 PM

Five-hundred years have passed since Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the Castle Church door in Wittenberg, marking the beginning of the Protestant Reformation. As an ambitious, German monk grieving the corruption in the Catholic church, Luther served as the catalyst in what would be the most transformative time in Western religious thought. One of the ways he spread his doctrine and influence throughout Europe was the medium of music. In my writing, I exhibit how Luther utilized hymns and church music to embed his reformed theology in the minds of many. By first presenting the historical and religious context of Luther’s life, I explain how his environment ultimately led him to use music as a way to transform the Church. Afterwards, I discuss how congregational singing and the common vernacular in his songs proved to be vital elements of Luther’s liturgy, especially in light of historical criticism over his relationship with music. Furthermore, the German’s affinity for song, personal journey of faith, and views on God’s Word all combined to create a variety of hymns rooted in Scripture. My writing examines three hymns in particular: “From Depths of Woe I Cry to Thee,” “Dear Christians, One and All, Rejoice,” and “Jesus Christ, Our God and Savior,” which reveal Luther’s methodology and theology in worship music. Ultimately, my writing exhibits how Luther’s hymns determined the way in which Christians worshiped and viewed their God, demonstrating the power and importance of music in one’s perception of a higher being overall.

2:04 PM

Paradise Still Lost: Milton’s Timeless Insights of Humanity

Victoria Burdette, Winthrop University

Barnes Recital Hall

2:04 PM

John Milton’s epic poem, Paradise Lost, offers a portrayal of the Christian story of the fall of mankind in a manner complex and artful enough to raise a great deal of conversation surrounding the possible meanings and interpretations that the reader might derive from this poem. This paper takes historical context and autobiographical influences into consideration in its endeavor to uncover Milton’s insights about humanity and its relation to its Creator. Additionally, my research synthesizes key points and passages from the poem itself, along with the interpretations of critics from Milton’s time up until the present. The particular areas of focus dealt with here surround the main characters (Satan, God, and Mankind) within the space and setting in which we find them (Hell, Heaven, and Eden). Such a study uncovers dynamics of power and free will which, in turn, offer a sort of commentary on the way these concepts pertain to the realities of government on a large scale, but also the way we govern our individual lives on a smaller scale. Despite the differing viewpoints and readings of Milton examined here, any study of the account of the fall of Man leads us to important and valuable truths about human nature and our relationship to our world, to good and evil. Therefore, I hope that this study of Paradise Lost has uncovered some of Milton’s theological stance within his broader Puritan background in a way that reveals the valuable insights about human life that this poem holds within the context of religious experience.

2:45 PM

HiJinks by Anthony O'Toole

Joseph Ritchie, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Douglas Black Jr., D.M.A., and Tomoko Deguchi, Ph.D.

Barnes Recital Hall

2:45 PM

Composer Anthony O’Toole was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1990. While at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, HiJinks was commissioned to O’Toole by Adam Crowe, tubist with the Coast Guard Band. When O’Toole heard Crowe perform, he was impressed with his abilities, and wanted to compose a solo work that would show off all of Crowe’s skills, including technical dexterity and flexibility, a wide range, rhythmic precision, clarity of articulation, and a solid tone. HiJinks is a showpiece with a rhapsodic feel that contains several contrasting sections but with common thematic elements. HiJinks is a single-movement composition with six sections. The first section begins with a flowing accompaniment, with a free and heroic melody. The second section takes the listener on a playful journey as the tubist introduces the main theme of the piece. The third section demonstrates the lyrical ability of the tuba. The fourth section features a piano interlude with a heroic statement for the soloist, which also leads into the cadenza. The cadenza is one of comedic relief. The soloist has had too much fun on his or her journey and starts to become slightly disoriented. The sixth section acts as a recapitulation of the main theme from section two, while simultaneously pushing the music towards the end. As a composer, O’Toole combines his deep love for music and people to create engaging art. He believes that one should treat people like gold because they are the true measure of wealth.

3:00 PM

Textual Analysis and the Creative Decision-Making Process

Phylisha Mace, Winthrop University
Makala Becker, Winthrop University
Aimee-Grace Wilson, Winthrop University
Joy White, Winthrop University
Hannah Baird, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Sarah Provencal, M.F.A., and Daniel Gordon, M.F.A.

Barnes Recital Hall

3:00 PM

The role of the director in a production is one of exceptional leadership and decision-making. It is a labor of love that requires a plethora of choices. The director works with a multitude of other people serving on a creative team in order to craft and portray a piece of literature as a visual and interactive medium. When watching a production, one question can often be asked: “Why did the director make that decision?” These decisions are often based in textual analysis, discussions, and sometimes, pure instinct. This presentation will discuss the creative process, specifically around the play that I directed, Precious Little by Madeleine George. Through this play, I sought to explore ideas of communication, the implications of abortion, and the relationships that we craft and maintain with the people around us. In this presentation, I seek to explore and shed light on the production process, from the proposal of the show, to the production meetings, to rehearsals, and to the final, ephemeral production of the show.

3:15 PM

Life Within a Box

Katelyn Arledge, Winthrop University
Mikaela Laxton, Winthrop University
Katie-Laken Weeks, Winthrop University
Anna Grace McLaughlin, Winthrop University
Megan E. Smith, Winthrop University
Semira Daniels, Winthrop University
Daphne Oliver, Winthrop
Serena Connelly, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Meg Schriffen, M.F.A.

Barnes Recital Hall

3:15 PM

Through dance, this piece explores limitations or, more specifically, the situation individuals face when they are put “in a box.” This "boxing in" can be of one's own doing, in the mind, or the doing of others, through words, actions, or societal expectations. I believe that in life there are many times when individuals think or are told what they can and cannot or should and should not do, which limits them from reaching their full potential. As unique individuals, we cannot be placed into neatly defined boxes. Through my choreography, I explore the act of being put in a box, the feelings one has when confined or limited, and the act of trying to escape one’s box. Movement is contrasted between bound and small and unrestricted and full to show the contrast between being confined in a box and free to explore.

3:22 PM

Two Within One

Katie-Laken Weeks, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Emily Morgan, M.F.A.

Barnes Recital Hall

3:22 PM

Two Within One is a blend of the contemporary and jazz genres of dance. My dancers were extremely willing to experiment with me, and even though they come from completely different dance backgrounds, they performed this piece successfully. I found my inspiration for this dance by simply doing movement that I enjoy (contemporary- and jazz-based), and that would also compliment my dancers. A goal of mine throughout this process was to achieve this blend of two different genres, and have them work together well. My choreographic process is very much about my dancers, what they feel comfortable doing, and how I can compliment their movement style through my own. There is a large amount of partner work within this piece, and it took a while to figure out exactly what I wanted. The moments where my dancers acknowledge each other and have partner work were the most challenging parts of this process. This is because I wanted the transitions and partner work to flow, and not have awkward pauses. Timing was a huge focus of mine in this dance, since the music was composed specifically for my piece, which is a rare opportunity. My movement was also inspired by the music, because it helped me direct my energy, and had the overall vibe and feel of the piece.

3:30 PM

Neurosis

Tiffany Moss, Winthrop University

Accompanist: with dancers Andrea Ward, Katie-Laken Weeks, and Emmalee Bradley

Faculty Mentor: Emily Morgan, M.F.A., and Meg Schriffen, M.F.A.

Barnes Recital Hall

3:30 PM

Neurosis (meaning a mental disturbance) is a trio about what goes on in the mind of someone with extreme insecurity and depression. It depicts insecurities in one’s head as being menacing, controlling, and authoritative, due to the stress they put on an individual and the emotional instability they can cause. In order to show this contrast, dancers have different roles, one as the victim and the other two as the constant insecurities lurking behind, to which she always succumbs.