Title of Abstract

The Global Dynamics of HPV and Cervical Cancer with an Immune Response

Submitting Student(s)

MeiRose Barnette
Jeremiah Boyd

Session Title

Additional Projects

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Kristen Abernathy, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Mathematics

Abstract

Cervical cancer is the second leading type of cancer in women and is often caused by the Human Papilloma virus (HPV). The persistence of high-risk HPV infection leads to precancerous lesions, which then can become malignant. Some HPV infections can be cleared by a healthy immune response. The goal of this project is to study the long-term dynamics of a system of ordinary differential equations which describes the dynamics of an HPV infection under an immune response. Using Lyapunov Stability Theory, we fully describe the long-term dynamics of several sub-models, including the disease-only sub-model and the sub-model of HPV with an immune response. In the latter sub-model, we see that the recruitment terms for an antibody and immune cell response play an important role in reducing the viral load. We conclude with numerical simulations of the full model and a discussion of biological implications with future work.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

The Global Dynamics of HPV and Cervical Cancer with an Immune Response

Cervical cancer is the second leading type of cancer in women and is often caused by the Human Papilloma virus (HPV). The persistence of high-risk HPV infection leads to precancerous lesions, which then can become malignant. Some HPV infections can be cleared by a healthy immune response. The goal of this project is to study the long-term dynamics of a system of ordinary differential equations which describes the dynamics of an HPV infection under an immune response. Using Lyapunov Stability Theory, we fully describe the long-term dynamics of several sub-models, including the disease-only sub-model and the sub-model of HPV with an immune response. In the latter sub-model, we see that the recruitment terms for an antibody and immune cell response play an important role in reducing the viral load. We conclude with numerical simulations of the full model and a discussion of biological implications with future work.