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Session Title

Design and Fine Arts

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Department of Fine Arts

Abstract

Well One Time At Camp… is a body of mixed media paintings exploring the history of storytelling and memory through the scope of summer camp. Subjects from Camp Seneca Lake, ranging from the ages of 8 to 58, were interviewed to recall their most memorable moments while at camp. The stories were recorded and used as narrative inspiration for the body of work. The larger mixed media paintings incorporate found objects to examine the effects left by the memory and were inspired by Robert Rauschenberg’s combine-paintings. The smaller works are inspired by plaques that line the walls of the dining hall at Camp Seneca Lake. The process of creation played with the specificity and generality of storytelling. Depending on the point of view, details and moments from the narrative can be altered or forgotten. This essay focused on the perspective and timeline of each narrative to determine how specific or general the representation of the setting could be. The abstraction, color, and materiality of each piece reflected the descriptors and word choice used in each interview. An 8-year-old’s story including distinct childlike word choice led to a more youthful and simple color palette. Lengthier memories that were told with more maturity required thoughtful consideration to details and abstracted laying of moments. The abstraction of the narratives and lack of text hinders how easily the audience can understand the narrative, but allows the audience the opportunity to add their own interpretations to continue the evolution of the story.

Honors Thesis Committee

Claudia O'Steen, M.F.A.; Darren Ritzer, Ph.D.; and Evelyne Weeks, M.A.

Start Date

24-4-2020 12:00 AM

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Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

Well One Time At Camp…: A Visual Exploration into Storytelling at Summer Camp

Well One Time At Camp… is a body of mixed media paintings exploring the history of storytelling and memory through the scope of summer camp. Subjects from Camp Seneca Lake, ranging from the ages of 8 to 58, were interviewed to recall their most memorable moments while at camp. The stories were recorded and used as narrative inspiration for the body of work. The larger mixed media paintings incorporate found objects to examine the effects left by the memory and were inspired by Robert Rauschenberg’s combine-paintings. The smaller works are inspired by plaques that line the walls of the dining hall at Camp Seneca Lake. The process of creation played with the specificity and generality of storytelling. Depending on the point of view, details and moments from the narrative can be altered or forgotten. This essay focused on the perspective and timeline of each narrative to determine how specific or general the representation of the setting could be. The abstraction, color, and materiality of each piece reflected the descriptors and word choice used in each interview. An 8-year-old’s story including distinct childlike word choice led to a more youthful and simple color palette. Lengthier memories that were told with more maturity required thoughtful consideration to details and abstracted laying of moments. The abstraction of the narratives and lack of text hinders how easily the audience can understand the narrative, but allows the audience the opportunity to add their own interpretations to continue the evolution of the story.