Event Title

Goat Farming in Rural Nicaragua

Session Title

Global Issues and Terrorism

Faculty Mentor

Ginger Williams, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

Location

DIGS 114

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:45 PM

Description

There have been many different initiatives and projects aimed at developing goat farming to help developing communities and countries around the world. Dr. Williams, a professor here at Winthrop University, started working with and bringing students to a rural community in 2007. Ever since then, there have been multiple different initiatives and development projects to help the community. Through service learning projects, Dr. Williams and her students are trying to implement projects that will sustain communities in the long run. This paper and research will look at the effect of goat farming on two rural communities in Nicaragua. Using the disciplines of economics and anthropology, the research will look at past goat farming projects in various parts of the world and study the current state of the communities. The research shows that it is important to define cultural challenges and barriers and to implement data research, an experimental design, and a cost and benefits analysis, so that the causality of the goats will be better understood for the development of the communities.

Course Assignment

IDVS 490 – Williams

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Apr 12th, 2:45 PM

Goat Farming in Rural Nicaragua

DIGS 114

There have been many different initiatives and projects aimed at developing goat farming to help developing communities and countries around the world. Dr. Williams, a professor here at Winthrop University, started working with and bringing students to a rural community in 2007. Ever since then, there have been multiple different initiatives and development projects to help the community. Through service learning projects, Dr. Williams and her students are trying to implement projects that will sustain communities in the long run. This paper and research will look at the effect of goat farming on two rural communities in Nicaragua. Using the disciplines of economics and anthropology, the research will look at past goat farming projects in various parts of the world and study the current state of the communities. The research shows that it is important to define cultural challenges and barriers and to implement data research, an experimental design, and a cost and benefits analysis, so that the causality of the goats will be better understood for the development of the communities.