Event Title

The Psychology of the Young Learner in Social Settings: School, Family Life, and Community

Faculty Mentor

Cheryl Fortner-Wood, Ph.D., and Ginger Williams, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

Location

West 214

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:45 PM

Description

Inspired by my courses in early childhood education and psychology, the goal of this research is to better understand what roles homelessness and other socioeconomic statuses play in the psychology of young children and how this affects their behavior in social settings, such as school, family life, and their communities. Financial income, level of education, and occupational status of the parent(s) are the factors that make up socioeconomic status. Familial background and the socioeconomic status of the families play a major role in the psychological growth of children and the way they see themselves. The way children see themselves impacts how they function academically in school, socially with their peers and in their communities, and ultimately predicts how they will function as adults. My research starts with homeless children and then moves up the socioeconomic scale with low socioeconomic status, middle, and high socioeconomic status, by clearly defining each level and then comparing and contrasting them based on the similarities and differences of each level academically and socially. At the conclusion of my research, I will have a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of socioeconomic status on the psychology of young children and what each category needs to function properly.

Course Assignment

IDVS 490 – Fortner-Wood

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Apr 20th, 2:45 PM

The Psychology of the Young Learner in Social Settings: School, Family Life, and Community

West 214

Inspired by my courses in early childhood education and psychology, the goal of this research is to better understand what roles homelessness and other socioeconomic statuses play in the psychology of young children and how this affects their behavior in social settings, such as school, family life, and their communities. Financial income, level of education, and occupational status of the parent(s) are the factors that make up socioeconomic status. Familial background and the socioeconomic status of the families play a major role in the psychological growth of children and the way they see themselves. The way children see themselves impacts how they function academically in school, socially with their peers and in their communities, and ultimately predicts how they will function as adults. My research starts with homeless children and then moves up the socioeconomic scale with low socioeconomic status, middle, and high socioeconomic status, by clearly defining each level and then comparing and contrasting them based on the similarities and differences of each level academically and socially. At the conclusion of my research, I will have a more comprehensive understanding of the effects of socioeconomic status on the psychology of young children and what each category needs to function properly.