Event Title

The Gay Neighborhood: Social Enclave or Gentrification Catalyst?

Faculty Mentor

Maria Aysa-Lastra, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Anthropology

Location

DIGS 221

Start Date

20-4-2018 3:45 PM

Description

Originally, gay neighborhoods appeared in less desirable areas due to the stigmatization of the gay community; but with gay assimilation and acceptance increasing, the communities have developed into something altogether more affluent through the process of gentrification. The effect gay neighborhoods have on the urban landscape is something that remains unclear, and that is why this article seeks to add to our understanding of these communities as both necessary safe spaces and possibly hostile presences for the surrounding lower class communities and people of color. This article seeks to measure previously defined indicators of gentrification in neighborhoods that contain above average gay household presence and determining whether there exists a correlation between gay presence and neighborhood gentrification. I use data from the 2000 and 2010 United States Censuses. Seven states, along with Washington D.C., were selected for their notable gay neighborhoods and representation of multiple United States geographical regions. From this dataset, gay households (head of household being the same gender as second person of household) were separated from straight households (head of household being the opposite gender of the second person of household) and measured by Census tract. Results of my research indicate that in areas with increased gay presence, there is an increase in both income and rented households, mirroring previous research and suggesting that gay presence likely also indicates gentrification.

Course Assignment

SOCL 516 – Aysa-Lastra

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Apr 20th, 3:45 PM

The Gay Neighborhood: Social Enclave or Gentrification Catalyst?

DIGS 221

Originally, gay neighborhoods appeared in less desirable areas due to the stigmatization of the gay community; but with gay assimilation and acceptance increasing, the communities have developed into something altogether more affluent through the process of gentrification. The effect gay neighborhoods have on the urban landscape is something that remains unclear, and that is why this article seeks to add to our understanding of these communities as both necessary safe spaces and possibly hostile presences for the surrounding lower class communities and people of color. This article seeks to measure previously defined indicators of gentrification in neighborhoods that contain above average gay household presence and determining whether there exists a correlation between gay presence and neighborhood gentrification. I use data from the 2000 and 2010 United States Censuses. Seven states, along with Washington D.C., were selected for their notable gay neighborhoods and representation of multiple United States geographical regions. From this dataset, gay households (head of household being the same gender as second person of household) were separated from straight households (head of household being the opposite gender of the second person of household) and measured by Census tract. Results of my research indicate that in areas with increased gay presence, there is an increase in both income and rented households, mirroring previous research and suggesting that gay presence likely also indicates gentrification.