Event Title

Made in the USA with Mexican Parts: The Complexities of Gender, Ethnic Identity, and Skin Color and How They Affect Multiethnic Alliances

Faculty Mentor

Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Location

West Center, Room 221

Start Date

21-4-2017 1:00 PM

Description

In her book No Turning Back: The History of Feminism and the Future of Women, Estelle B. Freedman asserts that “because of historical, social, national, and personal differences, women cannot assume a sisterhood.” In this essay, I will first discuss the complexities of two of the plethora of possible differences, or intersections. I will examine ethnic identities and skin color through the writings of many feminists of color, such as Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Nellie Wong, Barbara Cameron, and June Jordan to name a few, who have written on these complicated subjects. Next, I will discuss why these complexities of identity make it difficult for women to simply “assume a sisterhood.” Finally, I will discuss who can or cannot assume a sisterhood and what might be necessary to create one. This paper specifically explores women of color living in the United States and the term “sisterhood” respectfully refers to connections between minority women also living in the U.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Women's Studies Association (SEWSA) Conference, Winthrop University, March 2016

Course Assignment

PLSC 553 – Lipscomb

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 1:00 PM

Made in the USA with Mexican Parts: The Complexities of Gender, Ethnic Identity, and Skin Color and How They Affect Multiethnic Alliances

West Center, Room 221

In her book No Turning Back: The History of Feminism and the Future of Women, Estelle B. Freedman asserts that “because of historical, social, national, and personal differences, women cannot assume a sisterhood.” In this essay, I will first discuss the complexities of two of the plethora of possible differences, or intersections. I will examine ethnic identities and skin color through the writings of many feminists of color, such as Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Nellie Wong, Barbara Cameron, and June Jordan to name a few, who have written on these complicated subjects. Next, I will discuss why these complexities of identity make it difficult for women to simply “assume a sisterhood.” Finally, I will discuss who can or cannot assume a sisterhood and what might be necessary to create one. This paper specifically explores women of color living in the United States and the term “sisterhood” respectfully refers to connections between minority women also living in the U.