Event Title

Establishing a Novel 3D Tissue Culture System to Study Osteogenesis In Vitro

Poster Number

08

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Mathew M. Stern

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

22-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

22-4-2016 2:00 PM

Description

The invention of 3D printers has made the process of engineering patent-specific prosthetic limbs less complex and more cost-efficient. While this represents a huge step forward for individuals that are in need of these limbs, several problems arise due to the non-biological nature of the prosthetics. In order for a recipient to obtain a limb that will mature and grow as they do, the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine must make major advances in their ability to deliver clinical scale composite tissues. This requires an improved understanding of how different types of cells behave in a three-dimensional system. However, for decades, the in vitro study of cells, including bone cells, has been based on traditional two-dimensional cell culture. We hypothesized that 3D-printed scaffolds could provide a cost-efficient model to study osteogenesis in a three-dimensional in vitro system. To test this hypothesis, we printed three-dimensional scaffolds to the precise dimensions of sheep trabecular bone, functionalized the scaffolds with collagen I and hydroxyapatite coatings, and seeded them with a murine osteoblast cell line. Our results showed that 1) the scaffolds are biocompatible with the osteoblasts, 2) osteoblasts can adhere to and proliferate on the scaffolds, and 3) approximately 50% of seeded cells are incorporated into the scaffold during an initial round of seeding. Our results suggest that this method, with further optimization, can serve as a useful model to better understand the regenerative potential of bone cells and/or populations of stem cells with osteogenic potential in a three-dimensional system.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Symposium, Winthrop University, July 2015
National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR), Asheville, North Carolina, April 2016

Grant Support?

Supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health IDeA Networks for Biomedical Research Excellence (NIH INBRE) and the Winthrop University Research Council

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

Establishing a Novel 3D Tissue Culture System to Study Osteogenesis In Vitro

Rutledge

The invention of 3D printers has made the process of engineering patent-specific prosthetic limbs less complex and more cost-efficient. While this represents a huge step forward for individuals that are in need of these limbs, several problems arise due to the non-biological nature of the prosthetics. In order for a recipient to obtain a limb that will mature and grow as they do, the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine must make major advances in their ability to deliver clinical scale composite tissues. This requires an improved understanding of how different types of cells behave in a three-dimensional system. However, for decades, the in vitro study of cells, including bone cells, has been based on traditional two-dimensional cell culture. We hypothesized that 3D-printed scaffolds could provide a cost-efficient model to study osteogenesis in a three-dimensional in vitro system. To test this hypothesis, we printed three-dimensional scaffolds to the precise dimensions of sheep trabecular bone, functionalized the scaffolds with collagen I and hydroxyapatite coatings, and seeded them with a murine osteoblast cell line. Our results showed that 1) the scaffolds are biocompatible with the osteoblasts, 2) osteoblasts can adhere to and proliferate on the scaffolds, and 3) approximately 50% of seeded cells are incorporated into the scaffold during an initial round of seeding. Our results suggest that this method, with further optimization, can serve as a useful model to better understand the regenerative potential of bone cells and/or populations of stem cells with osteogenic potential in a three-dimensional system.