Title of Abstract

The Effect of Interregional Inequalities on Orchestras

Submitting Student(s)

David Urich

Session Title

Final Oral Competition

Faculty Mentor

Ginger Williams, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

History

Abstract

How do interregional inequalities affect the landscape for orchestral revenue? Having adopted a reliance on contributions from the private sector, American orchestras function as cultural ambassadors and obtain funding from their communities. The literature confirms that the United States displays heterogeneity and inequality between these communities that affect the financial and practical performance of different orchestras. This thesis builds on the analysis of demographic and macroeconomic factors identified by economists, sociologists, and arts administrators. Using multiple regression analysis and panel data, this thesis attempts to model the relationship between socioeconomic variables and orchestral revenue. A comparative case study methodology then determines what orchestras that outperformed the regression did to escape the limitations of their market area. This thesis finds that some demographic and macroeconomic variables suggested by the literature possess weak relationships while some unexpected variables strongly affect orchestral revenue.

Honors Thesis Committee

Ginger Williams, Ph.D., Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D., Nicholas Moellman, Ph.D., Robert Wildman, M.F.A.

Course Assignment

IDVS490H - Williams and HONR451H - Lipscomb

Previously Presented/Performed?

Movement(s) in a Dynamic World: Interdisciplinary Perspectives Conference, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC, February, 2023 | Winthrop University Showcase of Winthrop University Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors, Rock Hill, SC, April 2023

Type of Presentation

Oral presentation

Start Date

15-4-2023 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

The Effect of Interregional Inequalities on Orchestras

How do interregional inequalities affect the landscape for orchestral revenue? Having adopted a reliance on contributions from the private sector, American orchestras function as cultural ambassadors and obtain funding from their communities. The literature confirms that the United States displays heterogeneity and inequality between these communities that affect the financial and practical performance of different orchestras. This thesis builds on the analysis of demographic and macroeconomic factors identified by economists, sociologists, and arts administrators. Using multiple regression analysis and panel data, this thesis attempts to model the relationship between socioeconomic variables and orchestral revenue. A comparative case study methodology then determines what orchestras that outperformed the regression did to escape the limitations of their market area. This thesis finds that some demographic and macroeconomic variables suggested by the literature possess weak relationships while some unexpected variables strongly affect orchestral revenue.