Title of Abstract

Tensions 1.1

Submitting Student(s)

Kai Griffin

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Claudia O'Steen, M.F.A.

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Fine Arts

Abstract

Theoria, ancient Greek for contemplation; corresponds to the Latin word contemplatio, "looking at", "gazing at", "being aware of”. The works I create to look and gaze upon, are direct results of investigations into theoretical studies, constructs, and ideas. What I do as an artist is look at things from diverse, and often divergent, perspectives; developing/supporting/opposing theories that aid in the creation of the thing seen. More than anything though, it is experience that allows me to see this - the spark where classical theory meets modern work; where analog meets digital; where handcrafted meets laser cut. Turning classical on its head through modern digitized techniques, I take, for example, the 600 years old technique of one-point linear perspective and flip it on its head by incorporating laser cut cast acrylic; creating forms that oscillate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional, both visually and physically. In bridging the gap between analog (old) and digital (new), I explore binary couplings and the paradigmatic relations between the two elements: light and shadow, translucency and opacity, intensity and apathy, masculine and feminine.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Tensions 1.1

Theoria, ancient Greek for contemplation; corresponds to the Latin word contemplatio, "looking at", "gazing at", "being aware of”. The works I create to look and gaze upon, are direct results of investigations into theoretical studies, constructs, and ideas. What I do as an artist is look at things from diverse, and often divergent, perspectives; developing/supporting/opposing theories that aid in the creation of the thing seen. More than anything though, it is experience that allows me to see this - the spark where classical theory meets modern work; where analog meets digital; where handcrafted meets laser cut. Turning classical on its head through modern digitized techniques, I take, for example, the 600 years old technique of one-point linear perspective and flip it on its head by incorporating laser cut cast acrylic; creating forms that oscillate between two-dimensional and three-dimensional, both visually and physically. In bridging the gap between analog (old) and digital (new), I explore binary couplings and the paradigmatic relations between the two elements: light and shadow, translucency and opacity, intensity and apathy, masculine and feminine.