Title of Abstract

Ubiquity

Submitting Student(s)

Abigail Catoe

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Claudia O'Steen, M.F.A. & Shaun Cassidy, M.V.A.

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Fine Arts

Abstract

Ubiquity is a series of spheres, varying in size and shape, made from steel that explores organic forms occurring throughout the natural world. These patterns occur throughout nature and can be seen in plants and fungi, specifically the Clathrus ruber mushroom, also known as the Basket Stinkhorn. The series takes over a section of a wall and appears to be continuously growing and spreading, eventually taking over the entire space. Considering both the element of the organic structures and the rapid expansion of the repeated patterns, the piece shows the true idea of what it means to be ubiquitous. By exploring these particular shapes and patterns, the work Ubiquity allows me to manipulate harsh, man-made materials such as steel to create fluid structures. When working with steel I consider the innate qualities of the material and begin to manipulate it in a way that defies this. Steel is a hard and rigid material that allows for mainly geometric structures. My work pushes steel to its limits so that the unforgiving material is changed into a structure appearing to have a more fluid movement and softer body. This idea, along with the idea of natural material and how it changes over time, allows for the creation of a unified body of organic forms.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Ubiquity

Ubiquity is a series of spheres, varying in size and shape, made from steel that explores organic forms occurring throughout the natural world. These patterns occur throughout nature and can be seen in plants and fungi, specifically the Clathrus ruber mushroom, also known as the Basket Stinkhorn. The series takes over a section of a wall and appears to be continuously growing and spreading, eventually taking over the entire space. Considering both the element of the organic structures and the rapid expansion of the repeated patterns, the piece shows the true idea of what it means to be ubiquitous. By exploring these particular shapes and patterns, the work Ubiquity allows me to manipulate harsh, man-made materials such as steel to create fluid structures. When working with steel I consider the innate qualities of the material and begin to manipulate it in a way that defies this. Steel is a hard and rigid material that allows for mainly geometric structures. My work pushes steel to its limits so that the unforgiving material is changed into a structure appearing to have a more fluid movement and softer body. This idea, along with the idea of natural material and how it changes over time, allows for the creation of a unified body of organic forms.