Title of Abstract

Effectiveness of Nutrition Education in Afterschool Settings for Elementary Aged Children

Poster Number

5

Submitting Student(s)

Kennedy Bajek

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Human Nutrition

Abstract

Pediatric obesity is a troubling problem related to low fruit, fiber and vegetable intake, and high intake of fat, sodium, and calories. The home environment, particularly not eating family meals, and low levels of physical activity also contribute to pediatric obesity. Schools could be an ideal place to teach nutrition education to children. Unfortunately, there is not always time to add nutrition education to curricula. For this reason, people have begun to look to afterschool programs as a place to give nutrition education. Recent research shows that nutrition education with a hands-on component, such as gardening education, can improve children's diets and healthy eating behaviors. This literature review examined the effectiveness of nutrition education programs for elementary-aged children. Each program included a hands-on component, and were taught in an afterschool setting. Studies found that after participating in afterschool nutrition education programs, children were more likely to try new foods, increase their vegetable, fiber, and whole grain intake, experience a decrease in Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference, and spend more time doing physical activity. Studies also found that nutrition education programs in afterschool settings need to be engaging and cost effective.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Effectiveness of Nutrition Education in Afterschool Settings for Elementary Aged Children

Pediatric obesity is a troubling problem related to low fruit, fiber and vegetable intake, and high intake of fat, sodium, and calories. The home environment, particularly not eating family meals, and low levels of physical activity also contribute to pediatric obesity. Schools could be an ideal place to teach nutrition education to children. Unfortunately, there is not always time to add nutrition education to curricula. For this reason, people have begun to look to afterschool programs as a place to give nutrition education. Recent research shows that nutrition education with a hands-on component, such as gardening education, can improve children's diets and healthy eating behaviors. This literature review examined the effectiveness of nutrition education programs for elementary-aged children. Each program included a hands-on component, and were taught in an afterschool setting. Studies found that after participating in afterschool nutrition education programs, children were more likely to try new foods, increase their vegetable, fiber, and whole grain intake, experience a decrease in Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference, and spend more time doing physical activity. Studies also found that nutrition education programs in afterschool settings need to be engaging and cost effective.