Title of Abstract

Equivocation

Submitting Student(s)

Nico Sweet

Session Title

Arts Expo

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Shaun Cassidy, M.V.A., Claudia O’Steen, M.F.A. & Stacey Davidson, M.F.A.

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Fine Arts

Abstract

Equivocation is about phenomenology and how our experiences of certain objects affect our consciousness. This installation focuses on the objects in a dining room: two chairs and a table. Equivocation transforms these everyday objects into something more ghostly and ethereal to get people to think more about their own experiences surrounding these frequently used objects. The purpose of this work is to get the audience to directly experience phenomenology; to observe, recognize, and react. Equivocation is displayed in a way that is neutral so that the viewer's reactions become part of the work itself. This interactive immersive installation gets viewers to think about their own interpersonal relationships in connection with these objects. While these ghostly objects are certainly the centerpiece of the room, the fractured audio that permeates the space is what makes this work immersive. I ask the viewer to go through the process of searching in order to discover what is kept secret and to contemplate more about themselves and their experiences. The name Equivocation was specifically chosen because of its vagueness and its ability to conceal the truth. It speaks to the ethereality of the objects and liminality of the space. These objects are nonfunctional. With their transparent skin and thin structure they are a visual remnant of their former selves. No one can use these objects for their intended purpose, which adds to their ambiguous nature. The ubiquity of these objects are what makes them so salient and ideal to reflect on the concept of phenomenology.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Equivocation

Equivocation is about phenomenology and how our experiences of certain objects affect our consciousness. This installation focuses on the objects in a dining room: two chairs and a table. Equivocation transforms these everyday objects into something more ghostly and ethereal to get people to think more about their own experiences surrounding these frequently used objects. The purpose of this work is to get the audience to directly experience phenomenology; to observe, recognize, and react. Equivocation is displayed in a way that is neutral so that the viewer's reactions become part of the work itself. This interactive immersive installation gets viewers to think about their own interpersonal relationships in connection with these objects. While these ghostly objects are certainly the centerpiece of the room, the fractured audio that permeates the space is what makes this work immersive. I ask the viewer to go through the process of searching in order to discover what is kept secret and to contemplate more about themselves and their experiences. The name Equivocation was specifically chosen because of its vagueness and its ability to conceal the truth. It speaks to the ethereality of the objects and liminality of the space. These objects are nonfunctional. With their transparent skin and thin structure they are a visual remnant of their former selves. No one can use these objects for their intended purpose, which adds to their ambiguous nature. The ubiquity of these objects are what makes them so salient and ideal to reflect on the concept of phenomenology.