Title of Abstract

The Room

Submitting Student(s)

Donya Babcock

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Claudia O'Steen, M.F.A. & Mark Hamilton, M.F.A.

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Fine Arts

Abstract

The Room is a collection of work that reflects my constant inner monologue that opposes itself. The idea of escaping to my room is visualized through photography and interdisciplinary installation. I use these media to communicate that my room provides a sense of safety and paranoia simultaneously. I explore how the four walls of my intimate space or room are similar to the walls of my mind and the challenges and safety that it might yield. In my photography, I use a slower shutter speed on my camera to give my subject an anthropomorphic aesthetic. This slower shutter speed causes the subject to have a phantom appearance and speaks to the concepts of isolation and fading. This allows the viewer to feel as if there is a loss of identity and reveals the constant battle with a seemingly opposing internal self. This installation consists of multiple photographs and interdisciplinary artworks that reference the mundane things that you would see in a bedroom. These artworks are strategically placed so that the viewer navigates the space in a purposeful way. This reveals a narrative of discovering my battling psyche processing the loss of close relationships and wavering mental health. The Room is a living arrangement of work that embodies my everyday thoughts and dissociative state and reveals my struggle with feeling safe or threatened.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

The Room

The Room is a collection of work that reflects my constant inner monologue that opposes itself. The idea of escaping to my room is visualized through photography and interdisciplinary installation. I use these media to communicate that my room provides a sense of safety and paranoia simultaneously. I explore how the four walls of my intimate space or room are similar to the walls of my mind and the challenges and safety that it might yield. In my photography, I use a slower shutter speed on my camera to give my subject an anthropomorphic aesthetic. This slower shutter speed causes the subject to have a phantom appearance and speaks to the concepts of isolation and fading. This allows the viewer to feel as if there is a loss of identity and reveals the constant battle with a seemingly opposing internal self. This installation consists of multiple photographs and interdisciplinary artworks that reference the mundane things that you would see in a bedroom. These artworks are strategically placed so that the viewer navigates the space in a purposeful way. This reveals a narrative of discovering my battling psyche processing the loss of close relationships and wavering mental health. The Room is a living arrangement of work that embodies my everyday thoughts and dissociative state and reveals my struggle with feeling safe or threatened.