Title of Abstract

Physical Activity: A Treatment Option for Mild to Moderate Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression

Poster Number

57

Submitting Student(s)

Bethany Golden

Session Title

Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

David Schary, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

In recent years, there has been a spike in sedentary behavior in youth and adolescents (ages 10-19). While the cause of this behavior is largely debated, research suggests it is caused by an increase in technology, time spent watching television and on devices, as well as an overall lack of physical activity. As time spent being physically active has decreased, obesity, anxiety, and depression have increased among adolescents. This literature review examines the relationship between physical activity and sedentary behavior, obesity, anxiety, and depression. Previous research indicates that increased physical activity not only decreases an adolescent’s sedentary behavior, but also reduces their risk of obesity. Further, research has shown that physical activity among adolescents improves their overall quality of life (the mental, physical, and social well-being of the individual) and reduces their risk of emotional problems, such as stress, fear, and worry, which are often precursors to clinical anxiety and depression. Studies have also shown that increased physical activity among adolescents has caused a decrease in symptoms of both anxiety and depression. Physical activity plays an important role in minimizing sedentary behavior and decreasing one’s risk of obesity, improves an individual’s quality of life, and decreases one’s symptoms of anxiety and depression. It is important that physical activity be encouraged throughout an adolescent’s life, as it can play a significant role in improving their overall mental health.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Physical Activity: A Treatment Option for Mild to Moderate Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression

In recent years, there has been a spike in sedentary behavior in youth and adolescents (ages 10-19). While the cause of this behavior is largely debated, research suggests it is caused by an increase in technology, time spent watching television and on devices, as well as an overall lack of physical activity. As time spent being physically active has decreased, obesity, anxiety, and depression have increased among adolescents. This literature review examines the relationship between physical activity and sedentary behavior, obesity, anxiety, and depression. Previous research indicates that increased physical activity not only decreases an adolescent’s sedentary behavior, but also reduces their risk of obesity. Further, research has shown that physical activity among adolescents improves their overall quality of life (the mental, physical, and social well-being of the individual) and reduces their risk of emotional problems, such as stress, fear, and worry, which are often precursors to clinical anxiety and depression. Studies have also shown that increased physical activity among adolescents has caused a decrease in symptoms of both anxiety and depression. Physical activity plays an important role in minimizing sedentary behavior and decreasing one’s risk of obesity, improves an individual’s quality of life, and decreases one’s symptoms of anxiety and depression. It is important that physical activity be encouraged throughout an adolescent’s life, as it can play a significant role in improving their overall mental health.