Title of Abstract

Exercise in Parkinson's disease on and off medication

Submitting Student(s)

Alexis London

Session Title

Additional Projects

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand how Parkinson’s disease medication affects the autonomic responses of individuals during an acute exercise stress test. In the other studies, we analyzed the benefits that exercise can have on individuals with Parkinson’s disease. In these three literatures, data was found concluding that medication does not appear to impact autonomic abnormalities during exercise and is disease manifested. It was also found that physical exercise can benefit cofounding variables such as attention, depressive symptoms and anxiety as well as physical factors in executive functioning. In the international literature it has also been found that exercise triggers plasticity related events in the human Parkinson’s Disease brain including excitation, increases and decreases in gray matter volume, and changes in BDNF levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Since exercise has been proven to be an effective matter within the community of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease, here is the recommended FITT specific principles for this population: Aerobic fitness should be 3-5 d/wk.; light to moderate; 30-60 min/day; yoga, swimming, rhythmic classes. Resistance: 2-3 d/wk.; light to moderate; 30 min; appropriate for client. Strength should be 2-3 d/wk.; 40-50% 1RM; 2-3 hours/wk.; focus on extensors. Lifestyle/neuromotor should be 2-3 d/wk.; appropriate challenges; 30-60 min; balance, weight shifting, reaching. Since there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, based off these literatures and other research it is concluded that a combination of exercise and medication is recommended for these individuals.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Exercise in Parkinson's disease on and off medication

The purpose of this study was to understand how Parkinson’s disease medication affects the autonomic responses of individuals during an acute exercise stress test. In the other studies, we analyzed the benefits that exercise can have on individuals with Parkinson’s disease. In these three literatures, data was found concluding that medication does not appear to impact autonomic abnormalities during exercise and is disease manifested. It was also found that physical exercise can benefit cofounding variables such as attention, depressive symptoms and anxiety as well as physical factors in executive functioning. In the international literature it has also been found that exercise triggers plasticity related events in the human Parkinson’s Disease brain including excitation, increases and decreases in gray matter volume, and changes in BDNF levels (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Since exercise has been proven to be an effective matter within the community of individuals with Parkinson’s Disease, here is the recommended FITT specific principles for this population: Aerobic fitness should be 3-5 d/wk.; light to moderate; 30-60 min/day; yoga, swimming, rhythmic classes. Resistance: 2-3 d/wk.; light to moderate; 30 min; appropriate for client. Strength should be 2-3 d/wk.; 40-50% 1RM; 2-3 hours/wk.; focus on extensors. Lifestyle/neuromotor should be 2-3 d/wk.; appropriate challenges; 30-60 min; balance, weight shifting, reaching. Since there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, based off these literatures and other research it is concluded that a combination of exercise and medication is recommended for these individuals.