Title of Abstract

Spinal Stabilization and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Exercise Programing on Gait and Back Pain in Lower Limb Amputees

Submitting Student(s)

Eryn Williamson

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

Lower limb loss negatively affects muscle power, joint range of motion, and the efficiency of gait patterns. Alterations in gait have also been defined as a risk factor for mechanical low back pain (MLBP) in lower limb amputees (LLAs). 34 LLAs underwent a progressive 8-week spinal stabilization program. Results found significant increases in step length on the amputated leg and gait velocity. Similar results were found when 25 transtibial amputees underwent 10 proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) treatments. However, reduction in step length of the sound leg was significant, suggesting a more symmetrical weight acceptance. A lower back health education program was applied to a group of 20 LLAs. Subjects were taught spinal stabilization and flexibility exercises. Gait parameters were not measured, but improvement in trunk flexibility and reduction in pain and disability scores were found significant when compared to the control. Exercise frequency: 2-3 days per week Intensity: Maintain abdominal bracing through full range of motion while completing sets and repetitions, then increase intensity with movement progression. Time: 3 sets of 10 repetitions Type: Spinal stabilization or core. PNF could be prioritized when balance, asymmetry of weight acceptance and gait is a concern. Spinal stabilization exercises have shown to improve the gait of LLAs and aid in the reduction of MLBP. Both methods would prove beneficial to LLAs.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Spinal Stabilization and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Exercise Programing on Gait and Back Pain in Lower Limb Amputees

Lower limb loss negatively affects muscle power, joint range of motion, and the efficiency of gait patterns. Alterations in gait have also been defined as a risk factor for mechanical low back pain (MLBP) in lower limb amputees (LLAs). 34 LLAs underwent a progressive 8-week spinal stabilization program. Results found significant increases in step length on the amputated leg and gait velocity. Similar results were found when 25 transtibial amputees underwent 10 proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) treatments. However, reduction in step length of the sound leg was significant, suggesting a more symmetrical weight acceptance. A lower back health education program was applied to a group of 20 LLAs. Subjects were taught spinal stabilization and flexibility exercises. Gait parameters were not measured, but improvement in trunk flexibility and reduction in pain and disability scores were found significant when compared to the control. Exercise frequency: 2-3 days per week Intensity: Maintain abdominal bracing through full range of motion while completing sets and repetitions, then increase intensity with movement progression. Time: 3 sets of 10 repetitions Type: Spinal stabilization or core. PNF could be prioritized when balance, asymmetry of weight acceptance and gait is a concern. Spinal stabilization exercises have shown to improve the gait of LLAs and aid in the reduction of MLBP. Both methods would prove beneficial to LLAs.