Title of Abstract

Instances of Escapism and the Messages within “Cinderella” Folklore

Submitting Student(s)

Nyombi Walthour-Corley

Session Title

Literature in Society

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Casey Cothran, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

English

Abstract

This paper explores elements of escapism and the messages behind traditional Cinderella folklore using Charles Perrault’s French “The Little Glass Slipper”, Kashmir’s “The Wicked Stepmother”, and “The Poor Turkey Girl” from Pueblo-Zuni mythology. Despite both differences and distances, connections between these tales can be made through their identities as escapist fantasies alongside their Cinderella-esque storylines. The implications behind the tales—upwards-mobility, surviving abuse, and remembering promises—point towards the intended messages that their original authors attempted to convey to their audiences. These messages are linked to the specific time period and cultural contexts that each tale belongs to, but still prove to be no less relevant today as they were generations before. Ultimately, the idea that misfortune is temporary and escape can be achieved from any and all situations can be gleaned from these three tales, connecting humanity and fantasy across miles.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Instances of Escapism and the Messages within “Cinderella” Folklore

This paper explores elements of escapism and the messages behind traditional Cinderella folklore using Charles Perrault’s French “The Little Glass Slipper”, Kashmir’s “The Wicked Stepmother”, and “The Poor Turkey Girl” from Pueblo-Zuni mythology. Despite both differences and distances, connections between these tales can be made through their identities as escapist fantasies alongside their Cinderella-esque storylines. The implications behind the tales—upwards-mobility, surviving abuse, and remembering promises—point towards the intended messages that their original authors attempted to convey to their audiences. These messages are linked to the specific time period and cultural contexts that each tale belongs to, but still prove to be no less relevant today as they were generations before. Ultimately, the idea that misfortune is temporary and escape can be achieved from any and all situations can be gleaned from these three tales, connecting humanity and fantasy across miles.