Title of Abstract

Changing Viewpoints of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans over the 20th-Century

Submitting Student(s)

Jordan Drewello

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Ginger Williams, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Abstract

The 20th-century saw war and bloodshed, unlike any other century. The world engaged in two world wars and the United States engaged in the Cold War with the Soviet Union which saw two hot wars in Vietnam and Korea. Yet, at the end of these wars, some of the soldiers did not seem to come back the way they left. They were different and experienced depression, anxiety and would often relieve their traumas of war. At first, they were thought of as crazy, but, over the 20th century, researchers from across different disciplines have come together to try and figure out what was happening to these veterans. The research attempts to answer the question: how have the 20th-century wars contributed to a better understanding of mental health, specifically post-traumatic stress disorder? To answer the question on how World War I, World War II, and Vietnam contributed to a better understanding of mental health and the creation of the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder, the disciples of history, psychology, and sociology will come together to discuss PTSD vs. shell shock, the importance of social acknowledgment, and changes in the healthcare system.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Changing Viewpoints of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Veterans over the 20th-Century

The 20th-century saw war and bloodshed, unlike any other century. The world engaged in two world wars and the United States engaged in the Cold War with the Soviet Union which saw two hot wars in Vietnam and Korea. Yet, at the end of these wars, some of the soldiers did not seem to come back the way they left. They were different and experienced depression, anxiety and would often relieve their traumas of war. At first, they were thought of as crazy, but, over the 20th century, researchers from across different disciplines have come together to try and figure out what was happening to these veterans. The research attempts to answer the question: how have the 20th-century wars contributed to a better understanding of mental health, specifically post-traumatic stress disorder? To answer the question on how World War I, World War II, and Vietnam contributed to a better understanding of mental health and the creation of the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder, the disciples of history, psychology, and sociology will come together to discuss PTSD vs. shell shock, the importance of social acknowledgment, and changes in the healthcare system.