Title of Abstract

Functional Movement Training as a Method to Reduce Injury Among Police and Firefighter Personnel

Poster Number

47

Submitting Student(s)

Sean Green

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

Firefighter and police occupations demand a high level of physical ability and fitness to effectively execute their job. In some instances, police and firefighter physical requirements match that of the military and athletes. Such high physical demand creates an increased risk of injury, many of which mimic the injuries seen in the military and sports. Within firefighting and the police force, musculoskeletal injury (MSKI) has consistently been reported as a leading form of injury. Sprains and strains are prominently reported as the primary MSKI sustained, and the leading cause of injury is associated with activities involving squatting and lifting, or from experiencing a trip or fall. In the military and in athletes, functional movement screening (FMS) is frequently used to assess functional movement patterns and to determine asymmetries and movement dysfunctions which increase the risk of injury. FMS testing assesses mobility, stability, and advanced movements to find movement dysfunctions. Results are then used to develop both general, and individualized, corrective training programs to minimize the likelihood of injury. Despite its use in athletic and military populations, FMS is not regularly applied in firefighting or police departments, but the benefits noticed among the military suggest FMS testing and training may be a worthwhile introduction. Therefore, this article will investigate how the implementation of FMS testing and corrective training can be advantageous within firefighting and police departments to minimize the occurrence of injury among personnel.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Functional Movement Training as a Method to Reduce Injury Among Police and Firefighter Personnel

Firefighter and police occupations demand a high level of physical ability and fitness to effectively execute their job. In some instances, police and firefighter physical requirements match that of the military and athletes. Such high physical demand creates an increased risk of injury, many of which mimic the injuries seen in the military and sports. Within firefighting and the police force, musculoskeletal injury (MSKI) has consistently been reported as a leading form of injury. Sprains and strains are prominently reported as the primary MSKI sustained, and the leading cause of injury is associated with activities involving squatting and lifting, or from experiencing a trip or fall. In the military and in athletes, functional movement screening (FMS) is frequently used to assess functional movement patterns and to determine asymmetries and movement dysfunctions which increase the risk of injury. FMS testing assesses mobility, stability, and advanced movements to find movement dysfunctions. Results are then used to develop both general, and individualized, corrective training programs to minimize the likelihood of injury. Despite its use in athletic and military populations, FMS is not regularly applied in firefighting or police departments, but the benefits noticed among the military suggest FMS testing and training may be a worthwhile introduction. Therefore, this article will investigate how the implementation of FMS testing and corrective training can be advantageous within firefighting and police departments to minimize the occurrence of injury among personnel.