Title of Abstract

A Literature Review of Flexibility Training for Persons with Scoliosis

Submitting Student(s)

Atley Livingston

Session Title

Additional Projects

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

There is limited research about exercise regimens to help improve postural control in persons with scoliosis. The goal of this review is to analyze recent research in order to educate persons with scoliosis on the best flexibility training to help the curvature in their spine. Flexibility training focusing on postural strength and has great benefits for people with scoliosis. Results support that specifically Schroth exercises help improve the curve status of their spine. Schroth exercises include breathing techniques, holding the body in a standing or sitting position, and the use of exercise bands, ladders, and therapy balls. Similar results were found in a clinical trial where Schroth exercise training benefited people with scoliosis more than core strengthening. Specific exercise training focusing on postural control techniques has been the most beneficial for scoliosis. Persons with scoliosis should perform flexibility training, specifically Schroth exercises, for at least 3 days per week for 1 hour each day. For intensity, stretches should be held for discomfort and should be done with multiple repetitions. Exercises should first be taught by a professional, and then they can be done alone. Persons with scoliosis can be limited on their exercise regimen, specifically resistance training. However, flexibility training using the Schroth exercise approach can help strengthen their spine and decrease their spinal curvature.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

A Literature Review of Flexibility Training for Persons with Scoliosis

There is limited research about exercise regimens to help improve postural control in persons with scoliosis. The goal of this review is to analyze recent research in order to educate persons with scoliosis on the best flexibility training to help the curvature in their spine. Flexibility training focusing on postural strength and has great benefits for people with scoliosis. Results support that specifically Schroth exercises help improve the curve status of their spine. Schroth exercises include breathing techniques, holding the body in a standing or sitting position, and the use of exercise bands, ladders, and therapy balls. Similar results were found in a clinical trial where Schroth exercise training benefited people with scoliosis more than core strengthening. Specific exercise training focusing on postural control techniques has been the most beneficial for scoliosis. Persons with scoliosis should perform flexibility training, specifically Schroth exercises, for at least 3 days per week for 1 hour each day. For intensity, stretches should be held for discomfort and should be done with multiple repetitions. Exercises should first be taught by a professional, and then they can be done alone. Persons with scoliosis can be limited on their exercise regimen, specifically resistance training. However, flexibility training using the Schroth exercise approach can help strengthen their spine and decrease their spinal curvature.