Title of Abstract

Alzheimer's Disease and Its Correlation to Exercise

Submitting Student(s)

Madison Haas

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

Over time there has been speculation whether Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is directly correlated through physical activity and/or exercise. Throughout the review(s), we began to dive deeper into breakthrough research that has shown significant references towards alleviation of symptoms related to AD, but not AD itself. In the below reviews, exercise is concluded to be a type of medication that will subdue symptoms of AD. AD is incurable, although there are multiple research trials and experiments we can only alleviate symptoms. In the Aging & Mental Health article, the scientists conducted a 16-week study of comprehensive workout regimens to compare with those who are diagnosed with depression and anxiety in AD patients, as this can provoke many emotional spirals. In all groups depression and anxiety was reduced via exercise modalities like the FITT program. An outstanding FITT component that worked for many patients throughout program consisted of; Aerobic FITT {2 days per wk., moderate; RPE 4-6, 30-35 minutes, chair yoga}. These modalities will serve as a baseline point for patients to use to improve symptoms of AD. Using exercise as a behavioral approach to help patients with AD has shown great success. Although there is more research needed throughout this process to clarify imperfections in the study, we can continue to broaden our knowledge throughout more studies. The treatment of depression in these patients have allowed scientists to see a clearer picture of the superior benefit physical activity can allow.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Alzheimer's Disease and Its Correlation to Exercise

Over time there has been speculation whether Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is directly correlated through physical activity and/or exercise. Throughout the review(s), we began to dive deeper into breakthrough research that has shown significant references towards alleviation of symptoms related to AD, but not AD itself. In the below reviews, exercise is concluded to be a type of medication that will subdue symptoms of AD. AD is incurable, although there are multiple research trials and experiments we can only alleviate symptoms. In the Aging & Mental Health article, the scientists conducted a 16-week study of comprehensive workout regimens to compare with those who are diagnosed with depression and anxiety in AD patients, as this can provoke many emotional spirals. In all groups depression and anxiety was reduced via exercise modalities like the FITT program. An outstanding FITT component that worked for many patients throughout program consisted of; Aerobic FITT {2 days per wk., moderate; RPE 4-6, 30-35 minutes, chair yoga}. These modalities will serve as a baseline point for patients to use to improve symptoms of AD. Using exercise as a behavioral approach to help patients with AD has shown great success. Although there is more research needed throughout this process to clarify imperfections in the study, we can continue to broaden our knowledge throughout more studies. The treatment of depression in these patients have allowed scientists to see a clearer picture of the superior benefit physical activity can allow.