Title of Abstract

Attraction and Retention of Low-Income Workers: A Study on Employee Perspectives

Poster Number

35

Session Title

Poster Session 2

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Melissa Carsten, Ph.D.

College

College of Business Administration

Department

Management & Marketing

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to understand how employers attract and retain employees at different wage levels throughout the organization. We also aim to understand how wage is related to employee satisfaction and loyalty. Using a quantitative survey methodology sampling full-time workers at different income levels, we tested hypotheses regarding relationships between income level, employee’s satisfaction with their managers, employee values, and whether employees feel appreciated by their employer. Our study uses previous literature and current survey data to examine the influences of different organizational factors and whether they affect employees’ retention in low-income jobs. Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis. Although data collection is still underway, the results of this study have the potential to inform business practices around employee attraction and retention, and its relationship with income level. With the current state of the labor market, and more employees resigning for different opportunities, our results can shape organizational policy aimed at retention, and help employees find more fulfilling employment.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Attraction and Retention of Low-Income Workers: A Study on Employee Perspectives

The purpose of this study is to understand how employers attract and retain employees at different wage levels throughout the organization. We also aim to understand how wage is related to employee satisfaction and loyalty. Using a quantitative survey methodology sampling full-time workers at different income levels, we tested hypotheses regarding relationships between income level, employee’s satisfaction with their managers, employee values, and whether employees feel appreciated by their employer. Our study uses previous literature and current survey data to examine the influences of different organizational factors and whether they affect employees’ retention in low-income jobs. Data will be analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis. Although data collection is still underway, the results of this study have the potential to inform business practices around employee attraction and retention, and its relationship with income level. With the current state of the labor market, and more employees resigning for different opportunities, our results can shape organizational policy aimed at retention, and help employees find more fulfilling employment.