Title of Abstract

Exercise Prescription in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

Submitting Student(s)

Bethany Golden

Session Title

Additional Projects

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport & Human Performance

Abstract

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (beta cells, which produce insulin, are destroyed), causing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). T1D occurs mostly in children and adolescents. In order to maintain normal levels of blood glucose, T1D patients administer insulin through an insulin pump or shot. Literature emphasizing the importance of exercise programming for T1D patients has greatly increased; however, literature is limited in exercise programming for children with T1D. One study revealed that a 12-week aerobic exercise program resulted in improved HbAc1 levels (HbAc1 is the average blood glucose level for 2-3 months) and peak oxygen uptake. Additionally, studies have shown that high intensity interval training (HIIT) is safe for T1D patients to participate in. T1D patients participating in either HIIT or aerobic exercise were not at risk for hypoglycemia. Youth with T1D should participate in aerobic exercise 7 days a week for part of the daily 60 minutes, doing, aerobic activities that they enjoy (swimming, cycling, running, dancing, etc.). Youth should also incorporate 2-3 days of resistance training (body weight exercises 8-10 repetitions with 1-3 sets or activities such as climbing on playground equipment). Flexibility (static and dynamic stretching) and bone strengthening (activities such as basketball, tennis, etc.) 2-3 days per week. The frequency of T1D being diagnosed in youth is increasing around the world. While insulin administration plays a critical role in managing T1D, it is important to encourage youth to engage in regular physical activity.

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

Exercise Prescription in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (beta cells, which produce insulin, are destroyed), causing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). T1D occurs mostly in children and adolescents. In order to maintain normal levels of blood glucose, T1D patients administer insulin through an insulin pump or shot. Literature emphasizing the importance of exercise programming for T1D patients has greatly increased; however, literature is limited in exercise programming for children with T1D. One study revealed that a 12-week aerobic exercise program resulted in improved HbAc1 levels (HbAc1 is the average blood glucose level for 2-3 months) and peak oxygen uptake. Additionally, studies have shown that high intensity interval training (HIIT) is safe for T1D patients to participate in. T1D patients participating in either HIIT or aerobic exercise were not at risk for hypoglycemia. Youth with T1D should participate in aerobic exercise 7 days a week for part of the daily 60 minutes, doing, aerobic activities that they enjoy (swimming, cycling, running, dancing, etc.). Youth should also incorporate 2-3 days of resistance training (body weight exercises 8-10 repetitions with 1-3 sets or activities such as climbing on playground equipment). Flexibility (static and dynamic stretching) and bone strengthening (activities such as basketball, tennis, etc.) 2-3 days per week. The frequency of T1D being diagnosed in youth is increasing around the world. While insulin administration plays a critical role in managing T1D, it is important to encourage youth to engage in regular physical activity.