Title of Abstract

The Relationship Between STEM Teacher Self-Efficacy and Retention with Respect to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Submitting Student(s)

Jasmine Moyd

Session Title

Schools and Education

Faculty Sponsor (for work done with a non-Winthrop mentor)

Kelly Costner, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Mathematics

Abstract

Teaching during COVID-19 offered surprising benefits along with the obvious frustrations in the virtual classroom. This paradox led to an investigation of teacher responses to and experiences during the pandemic. While news outlets offer perceptions of the general public, research-based articles provide more accurate information. There is little research thus far on teaching science, technology, engineering, and mathematics while remote instruction was necessary. A spring 2021 survey of SC Noyce Program graduates provided initial insight into STEM teachers’ feelings in terms of their self-efficacy as it relates to their intention to stay in the classroom before and during the pandemic. The current study enhances understanding of those results through qualitative data. The previous survey responses informed the development of questions for focus groups conducted in spring 2022. Results from focus group data analysis will address the question: What is the nature of the relationship between STEM teachers’ self-efficacy and their intent to remain in the classroom in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Start Date

15-4-2022 12:00 PM

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Apr 15th, 12:00 PM

The Relationship Between STEM Teacher Self-Efficacy and Retention with Respect to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Teaching during COVID-19 offered surprising benefits along with the obvious frustrations in the virtual classroom. This paradox led to an investigation of teacher responses to and experiences during the pandemic. While news outlets offer perceptions of the general public, research-based articles provide more accurate information. There is little research thus far on teaching science, technology, engineering, and mathematics while remote instruction was necessary. A spring 2021 survey of SC Noyce Program graduates provided initial insight into STEM teachers’ feelings in terms of their self-efficacy as it relates to their intention to stay in the classroom before and during the pandemic. The current study enhances understanding of those results through qualitative data. The previous survey responses informed the development of questions for focus groups conducted in spring 2022. Results from focus group data analysis will address the question: What is the nature of the relationship between STEM teachers’ self-efficacy and their intent to remain in the classroom in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic?