Title of Abstract

Impact of COVID-19 on Food Insecurity and Resiliency in College Students

Poster Number

12

Submitting Student(s)

Kiera AlexanderFollow

Faculty Mentor

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; licataa@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Human Nutrition

Faculty Mentor

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.

Abstract

Research has assessed food insecurity and its impact on college students. However, previous research has not determined the impact of a global pandemic on food insecurity levels and resilience in college students. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between food insecurity and resilience among college students. The COVID-19 outbreak began in the United States before data collection was complete. A secondary objective was to compare the relationships of these factors prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Students attending a post-secondary institution in the southeastern United States completed a cross-sectional online 27-item questionnaire during a 12-month period (Fall 2019 through Fall 2020). The survey included questions about demographic information, food insecurity indicators, and resiliency measures. Of the 420 students that completed the survey, 51% indicated experiencing some form of food insecurity in the past 12 months. Food insecurity indicators demonstrated students were more food secure in Summer 2020 than Fall 2019 (p=.023). Average anxiety levels increased from 5.9 in Fall 2019 to 6.99 in Fall 2020 (p=.005). Average stress increased from 6.19 in Summer 2020 to 7.06 in Fall 2020 (p=.004). There was a positive correlation between anxiety, depression, irritability, and stress and food insecurity indicators (p=.000). Food insecurity indicators were high throughout the study. Future studies are needed to assess the causes for the changes in food insecurity in the summer. In addition, food insecurity indicators seem to correlate to resiliency factors and further investigation on this relationship is needed.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Honors Thesis Committee

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Wanda Koszewski, Ph.D.; Karin Evans, M.A.

Honors Thesis Committee

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Wanda Koszewski, Ph.D.; Karin Evans, M.A.

Course Assignment

HONR 450H - Licata; 451H – Lipscomb; MCNR 300 – Fortner-Wood

Other Presentations/Performances

Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program Virtual Symposium, Rock Hill, SC., June 2020

Type of Presentation

Poster presentation

Start Date

16-4-2021 11:30 AM

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Apr 16th, 11:30 AM

Impact of COVID-19 on Food Insecurity and Resiliency in College Students

Research has assessed food insecurity and its impact on college students. However, previous research has not determined the impact of a global pandemic on food insecurity levels and resilience in college students. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between food insecurity and resilience among college students. The COVID-19 outbreak began in the United States before data collection was complete. A secondary objective was to compare the relationships of these factors prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Students attending a post-secondary institution in the southeastern United States completed a cross-sectional online 27-item questionnaire during a 12-month period (Fall 2019 through Fall 2020). The survey included questions about demographic information, food insecurity indicators, and resiliency measures. Of the 420 students that completed the survey, 51% indicated experiencing some form of food insecurity in the past 12 months. Food insecurity indicators demonstrated students were more food secure in Summer 2020 than Fall 2019 (p=.023). Average anxiety levels increased from 5.9 in Fall 2019 to 6.99 in Fall 2020 (p=.005). Average stress increased from 6.19 in Summer 2020 to 7.06 in Fall 2020 (p=.004). There was a positive correlation between anxiety, depression, irritability, and stress and food insecurity indicators (p=.000). Food insecurity indicators were high throughout the study. Future studies are needed to assess the causes for the changes in food insecurity in the summer. In addition, food insecurity indicators seem to correlate to resiliency factors and further investigation on this relationship is needed.