Title of Abstract

The Militarization of Domestic Policing in the United States and Mexico

Submitting Student(s)

Kevin HicksFollow

Session Title

Controversial Topics in Society : Past and Present

Faculty Mentor

Ginger Williams, Ph.D.; williamsv@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Interdisciplinary Studies

Faculty Mentor

Ginger Williams, Ph.D.

Abstract

The continued militarization of domestic police throughout the world has been one of the most pressing human rights concerns since the end of World War II. Some of the consequences of this process include the normalization of over policing, increased instances of police brutality, and the deaths of innocent civilians. The United States and Mexico are both impacted by this problem in unique ways and exploring their different experiences with police militarization can provide useful insight on how to best develop strategies that will halt its negative impacts on civilian life in North America. This paper will attempt to answer the following questions: To what extent has domestic policing become militarized in the U.S., and how does this compare to the extent of the institution’s militarization in Mexico? How does this process impact the lives of citizens in both countries, and what steps are being taken to remedy its consequences? Using the disciplines of history, sociology, and political science, I will explore the historical circumstances, legal evolutions, and institutional transformations that made the dramatic militarization of domestic police since the late-1960s in these two countries possible. The combination of these disciplines will provide a comprehensive lens that can analyze the complexities of this problem. I argue that the militarization of the police in the U.S. and Mexico is an intentional process that occurred in response to the growing demand for rights by societal minorities since the mid-20th century in an attempt to control and intimidate increasingly diverse populations.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

IDVS 490 - Williams

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

The Militarization of Domestic Policing in the United States and Mexico

The continued militarization of domestic police throughout the world has been one of the most pressing human rights concerns since the end of World War II. Some of the consequences of this process include the normalization of over policing, increased instances of police brutality, and the deaths of innocent civilians. The United States and Mexico are both impacted by this problem in unique ways and exploring their different experiences with police militarization can provide useful insight on how to best develop strategies that will halt its negative impacts on civilian life in North America. This paper will attempt to answer the following questions: To what extent has domestic policing become militarized in the U.S., and how does this compare to the extent of the institution’s militarization in Mexico? How does this process impact the lives of citizens in both countries, and what steps are being taken to remedy its consequences? Using the disciplines of history, sociology, and political science, I will explore the historical circumstances, legal evolutions, and institutional transformations that made the dramatic militarization of domestic police since the late-1960s in these two countries possible. The combination of these disciplines will provide a comprehensive lens that can analyze the complexities of this problem. I argue that the militarization of the police in the U.S. and Mexico is an intentional process that occurred in response to the growing demand for rights by societal minorities since the mid-20th century in an attempt to control and intimidate increasingly diverse populations.