Title of Abstract

Practicing what I Preach

Submitting Student(s)

Shannon RatchfordFollow

Session Title

Professional Practices in Creative Expressions- Session 2

Faculty Mentor

Anne Fiala, M.F.A.; Jim Connell, M.F.A.; fialaa@winthrop.edu; connellj@winthrop.edu

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Fine Arts

Faculty Mentor

Anne Fiala, M.F.A.; Jim Connell, M.F.A.

Abstract

A large part of my creative practice is focused onmy future students. What skills will they learn from me? What projects will inspire them? How can I hook these young minds on art? I firmly believe that the most accessible gateway into the world of art is through clay - because the largest deterring factor for young artists is self-comparison. In my own practice I force myself to avoid insecurity-based comparison with other artists knowing that I will one day model that mindset for children in hopes that they grow up to be secure in their abilities. At the age I will get to first meet my students, they have already had drawing experience, and are all at different skill levels - while most of them don’t even know what clay is. If I can give them an informed, diverse introduction to the world of ceramics through being as explorative with clay as possible in my own practice - I can give them an incentive and exciting foundation to build upon. Instead of wondering what could have been if I’d had access to better art teachers or resources; I make up for my missed student experiences by adopting a teacher’s growth mindset. In “practicing what I preach” I have become more resourceful, confident, intrinsically motivated, and immersed in art. Art education is beautiful and reflective - I include it in my artwork because as much as I can teach my students, they will teach me much more.

Course Assignment

ARTS 491 - Fiala

Start Date

16-4-2021 3:30 PM

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Apr 16th, 3:30 PM

Practicing what I Preach

A large part of my creative practice is focused onmy future students. What skills will they learn from me? What projects will inspire them? How can I hook these young minds on art? I firmly believe that the most accessible gateway into the world of art is through clay - because the largest deterring factor for young artists is self-comparison. In my own practice I force myself to avoid insecurity-based comparison with other artists knowing that I will one day model that mindset for children in hopes that they grow up to be secure in their abilities. At the age I will get to first meet my students, they have already had drawing experience, and are all at different skill levels - while most of them don’t even know what clay is. If I can give them an informed, diverse introduction to the world of ceramics through being as explorative with clay as possible in my own practice - I can give them an incentive and exciting foundation to build upon. Instead of wondering what could have been if I’d had access to better art teachers or resources; I make up for my missed student experiences by adopting a teacher’s growth mindset. In “practicing what I preach” I have become more resourceful, confident, intrinsically motivated, and immersed in art. Art education is beautiful and reflective - I include it in my artwork because as much as I can teach my students, they will teach me much more.