Title of Abstract

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Food Industry in the United States

Submitting Student(s)

Katherine WattsFollow

Session Title

Mental Health and General Wellness

Faculty Mentor

Brian Collins, MS, RDN, CDM, CFPP; collinsb@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Human Nutrition

Faculty Mentor

Brian Collins, MS, RDN, CDM, CFPP

Abstract

When the COVID-19 pandemic arrived in the United States unexpectedly, federal and state governments were quick to close businesses, factories, schools, and restaurants in a collective effort to slow the spread of the virus. This had an immediate effect on America’s food supply chain. As production of many goods came to a halt and Americans rushed to the stores to stock up, many stores experienced shortages and food prices were increased. In addition to restaurants, hospitals and long-term care facilities faced difficulties obtaining the foods, formulas, and supplements they need to care for their patients and residents. Many critically ill patients with COVID require enteral nutrition or supplementation in the hospital, increasing the demand for these products in already-crowded intensive care units. This thesis project explores the difficulties that restaurants and healthcare facilities have faced as a result of the pandemic, including shortages due to increasing demand and prices. Many dietitians have been unable to see patients due to a lack of personal protective equipment and COVID restrictions, and have begun to use new forms of technology to assess their patients. Managers have quickly created contactless ways to serve food to their customers or residents in long-term care and adjusted their typical menus based on what food products are available. This thesis explains how dietary managers and dietitians have changed their decision-making processes to adapt to new challenging circumstances.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Honors Thesis Committee

Brian Collins, MS, RDN, CDM, CFPP; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Leslie Van Horn, M.S.; Stephanie Nielson, M.S.

Honors Thesis Committee

Brian Collins, MS, RDN, CDM, CFPP; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Leslie Van Horn, M.S.; Stephanie Nielson, M.S.

Course Assignment

HONR 450H - Collins & HONR 451H - Lipscomb

Start Date

16-4-2021 3:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

The Impact of COVID-19 on the Food Industry in the United States

When the COVID-19 pandemic arrived in the United States unexpectedly, federal and state governments were quick to close businesses, factories, schools, and restaurants in a collective effort to slow the spread of the virus. This had an immediate effect on America’s food supply chain. As production of many goods came to a halt and Americans rushed to the stores to stock up, many stores experienced shortages and food prices were increased. In addition to restaurants, hospitals and long-term care facilities faced difficulties obtaining the foods, formulas, and supplements they need to care for their patients and residents. Many critically ill patients with COVID require enteral nutrition or supplementation in the hospital, increasing the demand for these products in already-crowded intensive care units. This thesis project explores the difficulties that restaurants and healthcare facilities have faced as a result of the pandemic, including shortages due to increasing demand and prices. Many dietitians have been unable to see patients due to a lack of personal protective equipment and COVID restrictions, and have begun to use new forms of technology to assess their patients. Managers have quickly created contactless ways to serve food to their customers or residents in long-term care and adjusted their typical menus based on what food products are available. This thesis explains how dietary managers and dietitians have changed their decision-making processes to adapt to new challenging circumstances.