Title of Abstract

Isolating, Purifying, and Investigating Mycobacterial Lysogens

Submitting Student(s)

Allyssa LewisFollow

Session Title

Biological Science Research

Faculty Mentor

Victoria Frost, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; Kristi Westover, Ph.D.; frostv@winthrop.edu; lipscombm@winthrop.edu; kohlk@winthrop.edu; westoverk@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Victoria Frost, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; Kristi Westover, Ph.D.

Abstract

Bacteria have shared an entangled evolutionary history with bacteriophages for the past three billion years. Some bacteriophages (phages) use a specific type of infectious pathway that helps maintain their host’s viability, thus enabling a mechanism of co-existence. To investigate this further, two temperate mycobacteriophages (ExplosioNervosa and Rhynn) were selected since both are able to form lysogens and exist in the host cell’s genome indefinitely as a prophage. Annotation of their genomes revealed immunity related genes that potentially explain how some phages are able to protect their host and resist superinfection by other related and non-related phages. Bacterial lysogens were created by incubating bacterial host cells with the phages. Resulting mesas were a sign that host cell growth had taken place in the presence of a prophage. The lysogens were purified and tested against their original infecting phage as well as an unrelated bacteriophage (Haimas) to see if they were able to resist superinfection. Tests showed that both Haimas and the original viruses were able to infect and lyse the lysogens. Infections of these phages on their own lysogens raised the idea of spontaneous reversion; the prophages possibly reverted to the lytic cycle due to a triggering condition in their environment. The ability of the host-phage relationship to respond to certain environmental signals warrants further investigation. Investigating the triggers and unraveling the mechanisms that fuel coevolution helps further our understanding of the host-parasite equilibrium that exists today and highlights opportunities for future applications.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

Please check this if you understand.

Honors Thesis Committee

Victoria Frost, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; Kristi Westover, Ph.D.

Honors Thesis Committee

Victoria Frost, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; Kristi Westover, Ph.D.

Other Presentations/Performances

Association of Southeastern Biologists, March 2021

Grant Support

SC INBRE 2019-2020 HHMI Sponsorship 2017

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:15 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 12:15 PM

Isolating, Purifying, and Investigating Mycobacterial Lysogens

Bacteria have shared an entangled evolutionary history with bacteriophages for the past three billion years. Some bacteriophages (phages) use a specific type of infectious pathway that helps maintain their host’s viability, thus enabling a mechanism of co-existence. To investigate this further, two temperate mycobacteriophages (ExplosioNervosa and Rhynn) were selected since both are able to form lysogens and exist in the host cell’s genome indefinitely as a prophage. Annotation of their genomes revealed immunity related genes that potentially explain how some phages are able to protect their host and resist superinfection by other related and non-related phages. Bacterial lysogens were created by incubating bacterial host cells with the phages. Resulting mesas were a sign that host cell growth had taken place in the presence of a prophage. The lysogens were purified and tested against their original infecting phage as well as an unrelated bacteriophage (Haimas) to see if they were able to resist superinfection. Tests showed that both Haimas and the original viruses were able to infect and lyse the lysogens. Infections of these phages on their own lysogens raised the idea of spontaneous reversion; the prophages possibly reverted to the lytic cycle due to a triggering condition in their environment. The ability of the host-phage relationship to respond to certain environmental signals warrants further investigation. Investigating the triggers and unraveling the mechanisms that fuel coevolution helps further our understanding of the host-parasite equilibrium that exists today and highlights opportunities for future applications.