Title of Abstract

The Impact of Distance Learning on Students with Low-Socioeconomic Backgrounds: An Autoethnography Exploration

Submitting Student(s)

Titus EcholsFollow

Session Title

Education : Students and Learning

Faculty Mentor

Sarah Marie Catalan Berry, Ph.D.; catalanas@winthrop.edu

College

College of Education

Department

English

Faculty Mentor

Sarah Marie Catalan Berry, Ph.D.

Abstract

As more sophisticated technology for distance learning makes its mark, the role of the teacher is being expanded to include skills and strategies appropriate to teaching students online. Some teachers welcome the opportunity, while others are challenged by distance teaching. In 2020, the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic forced an immediate change to distance teaching at all levels of education. This research examines the effects of distance learning by capturing the perspective of a First-Generation, African American college student who completed his spring 2020 and fall 2021 semesters online. In particular, questions will be asked to determine the positive and/or negative impact of learning for a black, first-generation student with low socioeconomic background. Due to social injustice, finical instability, and lack of experience, educators must understand how the world around a student can affect their academic performance. The data is captured through auto-ethnography, a form of qualitative research that analyzes data from personal experiences through a thematic coding system. The purpose of this research is to provide educators with a more focused lens to see the mind of a student who has to face systemic barriers. This research can assist teachers in helping students to meet Maslow Hierarchy of learning needs, which will increase students' overall academic success.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

MCNR 300 - Fortner-Wood

Other Presentations/Performances

Winthrop University McNair Research Symposium, Rock Hill, SC, June 2020

Grant Support

Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program

Start Date

16-4-2021 3:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

The Impact of Distance Learning on Students with Low-Socioeconomic Backgrounds: An Autoethnography Exploration

As more sophisticated technology for distance learning makes its mark, the role of the teacher is being expanded to include skills and strategies appropriate to teaching students online. Some teachers welcome the opportunity, while others are challenged by distance teaching. In 2020, the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic forced an immediate change to distance teaching at all levels of education. This research examines the effects of distance learning by capturing the perspective of a First-Generation, African American college student who completed his spring 2020 and fall 2021 semesters online. In particular, questions will be asked to determine the positive and/or negative impact of learning for a black, first-generation student with low socioeconomic background. Due to social injustice, finical instability, and lack of experience, educators must understand how the world around a student can affect their academic performance. The data is captured through auto-ethnography, a form of qualitative research that analyzes data from personal experiences through a thematic coding system. The purpose of this research is to provide educators with a more focused lens to see the mind of a student who has to face systemic barriers. This research can assist teachers in helping students to meet Maslow Hierarchy of learning needs, which will increase students' overall academic success.