Title of Abstract

Impact of COVID-19 on Food Insecurity and Resiliency in College Students

Submitting Student(s)

Kiera AlexanderFollow

Faculty Mentor

Four WU mentors: Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Wanda Koszewski, Ph.D.; Karin Evans, M.A.; licataa@winthrop.edu; lipscombm@winthrop.edu; koszewskiw@winthrop.edu; evansk@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Human Nutrition

Faculty Mentor

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Wanda Koszewski, Ph.D.; Karin Evans, M.A.

Abstract

Background: Research is needed to assess the correlates of food insecurity and levels of resilience within this population before and during a pandemic. Objective: Assess the relationship of food insecurity and resilience among college students and compare the relationships of these factors prior to and during COVID-19. Participants: Students attending a post-secondary institution in the southeastern region of the United States. Methods: A questionnaire including a Qualtrics survey consisting of 27 items distributed to a sample of university students. Results: 284 students completed the survey and statistical significance was found for food insecurity (p=0.002), levels of anxiety (p=.049), and hours slept (p=0.006). Before COVID-19, 56.1% of the participants were food secure while 34.2% were low food insecure and 9.6% were high food insecure. Comparably 74.7% of the participants were food secure, 22.1% were low food insecure and 3.2% were high food insecure during COVID-19. Resilience data showed a decrease in feelings of stress (80.7% to 70.5%) and an increase in feelings of depression (48.2% to 53.6%), anxiety (65.7% to 77.6%), and hours slept (66.3% to 76.9%). Conclusion: Food insecurity is an issue that has decreased significantly among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Students reported feeling less stress and an improvement in hours slept but their feelings of depression and anxiety worsened. Future studies should assess the causes for the changes in food insecurity and resilience during the global pandemic.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Honors Thesis Committee

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Wanda Koszewski, Ph.D.; Karin Evans, M.A.

Honors Thesis Committee

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Wanda Koszewski, Ph.D.; Karin Evans, M.A.

Other Presentations/Performances

Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program Virtual Symposium, Rock Hill, SC., June 2020

Type of Presentation

Poster presentation

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Impact of COVID-19 on Food Insecurity and Resiliency in College Students

Background: Research is needed to assess the correlates of food insecurity and levels of resilience within this population before and during a pandemic. Objective: Assess the relationship of food insecurity and resilience among college students and compare the relationships of these factors prior to and during COVID-19. Participants: Students attending a post-secondary institution in the southeastern region of the United States. Methods: A questionnaire including a Qualtrics survey consisting of 27 items distributed to a sample of university students. Results: 284 students completed the survey and statistical significance was found for food insecurity (p=0.002), levels of anxiety (p=.049), and hours slept (p=0.006). Before COVID-19, 56.1% of the participants were food secure while 34.2% were low food insecure and 9.6% were high food insecure. Comparably 74.7% of the participants were food secure, 22.1% were low food insecure and 3.2% were high food insecure during COVID-19. Resilience data showed a decrease in feelings of stress (80.7% to 70.5%) and an increase in feelings of depression (48.2% to 53.6%), anxiety (65.7% to 77.6%), and hours slept (66.3% to 76.9%). Conclusion: Food insecurity is an issue that has decreased significantly among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Students reported feeling less stress and an improvement in hours slept but their feelings of depression and anxiety worsened. Future studies should assess the causes for the changes in food insecurity and resilience during the global pandemic.