Title of Abstract

Using Deficiency Mapping to Locate the Mutagen-sensitivity Gene mus108 in the Drosophila melanogaster Genome

Submitting Student(s)

Bethany FossFollow

Faculty Mentor

One WU mentor: Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; kohlk@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Faculty Mentor

Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.

Abstract

DNA damage occurs regularly due to a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. DNA repair corrects this damage, to ensure that DNA is passed faithfully to offspring and reduce an individual’s chance of developing cancer. The purpose of this research project was to map mus108, a DNA repair gene in Drosophila melanogaster. To locate this gene on the X chromosome, we conducted a deletion-mapping experiment by crossing mus108 mutant flies with flies carrying deletions on the X chromosome. To assess the mus phenotype in the deletion-mapping experiment, we used a mutagen sensitivity assay. In this assay, one brood of offspring was treated with water and the second brood was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a DNA damaging agent. These crosses were repeated twice for two rounds of data, amounting to 5,439 flies scored. From this data, percent relative survival was calculated for each deletion. We have tentatively narrowed the genomic location of mus108 to one of these deletions. However, these results should be repeated before additional conclusions are drawn.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Honors Thesis Committee

Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Daniel Stovall, Ph.D.; Laura Glasscock, Ph.D.

Honors Thesis Committee

Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; Daniel Stovall, Ph.D.; Laura Glasscock, Ph.D.

Course Assignment

BIOL 450H - Kohl and HONR 451H - Lipscomb

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Using Deficiency Mapping to Locate the Mutagen-sensitivity Gene mus108 in the Drosophila melanogaster Genome

DNA damage occurs regularly due to a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. DNA repair corrects this damage, to ensure that DNA is passed faithfully to offspring and reduce an individual’s chance of developing cancer. The purpose of this research project was to map mus108, a DNA repair gene in Drosophila melanogaster. To locate this gene on the X chromosome, we conducted a deletion-mapping experiment by crossing mus108 mutant flies with flies carrying deletions on the X chromosome. To assess the mus phenotype in the deletion-mapping experiment, we used a mutagen sensitivity assay. In this assay, one brood of offspring was treated with water and the second brood was treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a DNA damaging agent. These crosses were repeated twice for two rounds of data, amounting to 5,439 flies scored. From this data, percent relative survival was calculated for each deletion. We have tentatively narrowed the genomic location of mus108 to one of these deletions. However, these results should be repeated before additional conclusions are drawn.