Title of Abstract

Providing Catharsis and Healing through Creative Processes

Submitting Student(s)

Thalia BastidasFollow

Faculty Mentor

Two WU mentors:Jason Tselentis, M.F.A.; Jesse Weser, M.F.A.; tselentisj@winthrop.edu; weserj@winthrop.edu; Two Non-WU mentors: Tamara LaValla, B.F.A.; Althea Holenko; makers@batchcraft.com; mail@altheaholenko.com

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Design

Faculty Mentor

Jason Tselentis, M.F.A.; Jesse Weser, M.F.A.; (Non-WU) Tamara LaValla, B.F.A.; Althea Holenko

Abstract

It’s time we start normalizing taboo conversations related to mental health, especially for under-represented communities like undocumented immigrants and their families. DREAMers and DACA holders are frequently overlooked or ignored when it comes to mental health, or in some cases, these people will avoid getting the help they need. DACA holders are people who were brought to the United States as children. They are eligible to work, go to college while meeting guidelines and certain restrictions. I pose the question, How might I use design as a tool to unpack my demons while talking about taboo issues such as mental health within immigrant communities? Providing awareness about healing through art, design, and creative writing can help make therapy more accessible and provide healing. I explore my own experience as a Dreamer and DACA holder and the “emotional baggage” that I carried, and how specific barriers can prevent young undocumented immigrants from receiving proper mental health support and the lack of accessibility in this demographic. It is necessary to bring awareness and attention to the use of creative processes as affordable methods that provide accommodation to the issue of therapy being accessible to under-represented and disadvantaged communities.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

VCOM 486 & VCOM 487 - Tselentis

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Providing Catharsis and Healing through Creative Processes

It’s time we start normalizing taboo conversations related to mental health, especially for under-represented communities like undocumented immigrants and their families. DREAMers and DACA holders are frequently overlooked or ignored when it comes to mental health, or in some cases, these people will avoid getting the help they need. DACA holders are people who were brought to the United States as children. They are eligible to work, go to college while meeting guidelines and certain restrictions. I pose the question, How might I use design as a tool to unpack my demons while talking about taboo issues such as mental health within immigrant communities? Providing awareness about healing through art, design, and creative writing can help make therapy more accessible and provide healing. I explore my own experience as a Dreamer and DACA holder and the “emotional baggage” that I carried, and how specific barriers can prevent young undocumented immigrants from receiving proper mental health support and the lack of accessibility in this demographic. It is necessary to bring awareness and attention to the use of creative processes as affordable methods that provide accommodation to the issue of therapy being accessible to under-represented and disadvantaged communities.