Title of Abstract

The Hills: A Composition for String Orchestra and Harp

Submitting Student(s)

Madison BushFollow

Faculty Mentor

Three WU mentors: Leonard Mark Lewis, D.M.A.; Tomoko Deguchi, Ph.D.; Ronald Parks, Ph.D.; mlewis@winthrop.edu; deguchit@winthrop.edu; parksr@winthrop.edu

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Music

Faculty Mentor

Leonard Mark Lewis, D.M.A.; Tomoko Deguchi, Ph.D.; Ronald Parks, Ph.D.

Abstract

The Hills, a creative submission, is a composition written for harp and string orchestra. One purpose of this piece is to experiment with richer, fuller sounds from a string orchestra, as well as to combine its timbre and texture with that of a harp. Additionally, this piece was composed as a demonstration of compositional growth based on a period of ten years. The melodic content of this piece is meant to portray the landscape and beauty of rolling hills. The ascending and descending sixteenth note rhythms capture the contour of the landscape, and the dips and peaks of the earth. The moments in the piece in which the music shimmers with tremolo or remains fixed in the upper registers of the strings portrays the fog that settles in, and the summit of the hills that allow one to see the entirety of the landscape from above.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

Please check this if you understand.

Type of Presentation

Performance of my creative work

Performance Description

A audio recording of the piece will be played. The piece is about nine minutes long, and the remaining time can be used for questions from the audience.

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The Hills: A Composition for String Orchestra and Harp

The Hills, a creative submission, is a composition written for harp and string orchestra. One purpose of this piece is to experiment with richer, fuller sounds from a string orchestra, as well as to combine its timbre and texture with that of a harp. Additionally, this piece was composed as a demonstration of compositional growth based on a period of ten years. The melodic content of this piece is meant to portray the landscape and beauty of rolling hills. The ascending and descending sixteenth note rhythms capture the contour of the landscape, and the dips and peaks of the earth. The moments in the piece in which the music shimmers with tremolo or remains fixed in the upper registers of the strings portrays the fog that settles in, and the summit of the hills that allow one to see the entirety of the landscape from above.