Title of Abstract

Race Predicts Perceptions of Significant Learning Before and After the COVID-19 Pandemic

Faculty Mentor

One WU mentor: Donna Nelson, Ph.D.; nelsond@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Donna Nelson, Ph.D.

Abstract

Our study examined college students’ reports of significant learning experiences before and after the remote learning period associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The extent to which race predicted different perceptions of experiences was also examined. Participants were 127 undergraduate students who completed an anonymous online survey. First, they reported the extent to which they had experienced each of Fink’s six types of significant learning while in college. Next, they responded to items intended to measure the effect of COVID-19 on each type of learning in Fink’s taxonomy. Results revealed that White students reported experiencing higher levels of significant learning in college than Black students. Furthermore, students overall reported a decrease in foundational knowledge and caring about learning and an increase in learning about the self and others as a result of the remote learning period associated with the pandemic. Black students, however, experienced a higher increase in the Human Dimension category (i.e., learning about themselves and others) than their White counterparts.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

MCNR 300 - Fortner-Wood

Other Presentations/Performances

Winthrop University McNair Research Symposium, Rock Hill, SC., June 2020 67th Annual Southeastern Psychological Association Virtual Conference., March 17 - 20, 2021

Grant Support

Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program

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Race Predicts Perceptions of Significant Learning Before and After the COVID-19 Pandemic

Our study examined college students’ reports of significant learning experiences before and after the remote learning period associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The extent to which race predicted different perceptions of experiences was also examined. Participants were 127 undergraduate students who completed an anonymous online survey. First, they reported the extent to which they had experienced each of Fink’s six types of significant learning while in college. Next, they responded to items intended to measure the effect of COVID-19 on each type of learning in Fink’s taxonomy. Results revealed that White students reported experiencing higher levels of significant learning in college than Black students. Furthermore, students overall reported a decrease in foundational knowledge and caring about learning and an increase in learning about the self and others as a result of the remote learning period associated with the pandemic. Black students, however, experienced a higher increase in the Human Dimension category (i.e., learning about themselves and others) than their White counterparts.