Title of Abstract

Does social media activity affect how politically active young people are?

Faculty Mentor

One WU mentor: Hye-Sung Kim, Ph.D.; kimh@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Political Science

Faculty Mentor

Hye-Sung Kim, Ph.D.

Abstract

In this study, we explore whether political activity levels among young adults are explained by the amount of time they spend on social media. Using the survey data compiled from PEW Research Center, we conduct multiple regression analyses to test whether an increase in social media use leads to an increase in political participation after controlling for various compositional differences, such as gender and party affiliation. The preliminary zero-order relationship shows that the amount of time individuals spend on social media and their political participation and engagement are positively correlated among young people. Through multiple regression analyses, we aim to examine whether this correlation holds even after controlling for potential confounders, such as party affiliation and gender. By analyzing this data, we hope to better understand the influence that social media has on the new generation's connection to political activity.

Course Assignment

PLSC 350 - Kim

Start Date

1-1-2021 12:00 AM

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Does social media activity affect how politically active young people are?

In this study, we explore whether political activity levels among young adults are explained by the amount of time they spend on social media. Using the survey data compiled from PEW Research Center, we conduct multiple regression analyses to test whether an increase in social media use leads to an increase in political participation after controlling for various compositional differences, such as gender and party affiliation. The preliminary zero-order relationship shows that the amount of time individuals spend on social media and their political participation and engagement are positively correlated among young people. Through multiple regression analyses, we aim to examine whether this correlation holds even after controlling for potential confounders, such as party affiliation and gender. By analyzing this data, we hope to better understand the influence that social media has on the new generation's connection to political activity.