Title of Abstract

The United States Maternal Mortality Rate and Race

Faculty Mentor

Two WU mentors; Jennifer Leigh Disney Ph.D.; Brandon Ranallo-Benavidez; disneyj@winthrop.edu ;benavidezb@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Political Science

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Disney, Ph.D. and Brandon Ranallo-Benavidez, Ph.D.

Abstract

Pregnancy is one of nature’s greatest miracles, but, when things go wrong, the celebration can turn catastrophic quickly. Maternal mortality is a topic many wish to ignore when having a child. Unfortunately, due to rising rates in certain demographics, it is imperative that we look into the problem. There are large disparities amongst women of color versus white women when it comes to the maternal mortality rate in the US. According to the CDC, Black and American Indian/Alaska Native women are two to three times more likely to die from complications during pregnancy than their white counterparts. Many of these deaths are ones that could have been avoided, which then raises the question: “Why are they not being avoided?” This paper seeks to address this disparity experienced by Black and Native women but not white women as to why the chances of them dying is two to three times higher. The miraculous gift of the ability to create and carry life all too often, particularly for mothers of color, turns into thousands of maternal deaths in America. We must address this issue. The shocking truth lies in the fact that although most women have the capability to carry a child, certain groups of women are more likely to die while in the midst of child-bearing process. By analyzing socio-economic factors, racial stereotypes, and cultural norms of these racial groups, this paper provides clarification as to why that is.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

PLSC 490- Disney & Ranallo-Benavidez

Start Date

1-1-2021 12:00 AM

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The United States Maternal Mortality Rate and Race

Pregnancy is one of nature’s greatest miracles, but, when things go wrong, the celebration can turn catastrophic quickly. Maternal mortality is a topic many wish to ignore when having a child. Unfortunately, due to rising rates in certain demographics, it is imperative that we look into the problem. There are large disparities amongst women of color versus white women when it comes to the maternal mortality rate in the US. According to the CDC, Black and American Indian/Alaska Native women are two to three times more likely to die from complications during pregnancy than their white counterparts. Many of these deaths are ones that could have been avoided, which then raises the question: “Why are they not being avoided?” This paper seeks to address this disparity experienced by Black and Native women but not white women as to why the chances of them dying is two to three times higher. The miraculous gift of the ability to create and carry life all too often, particularly for mothers of color, turns into thousands of maternal deaths in America. We must address this issue. The shocking truth lies in the fact that although most women have the capability to carry a child, certain groups of women are more likely to die while in the midst of child-bearing process. By analyzing socio-economic factors, racial stereotypes, and cultural norms of these racial groups, this paper provides clarification as to why that is.