Title of Abstract

Sexual Education Policies and Sexual Risk in Sexual Minority Youth

Poster Number

73

Submitting Student(s)

Victoria SulakFollow

Faculty Mentor

Brandon Ranallo-Benavidez, Ph.D.; Cheryl Fortner-Wood, Ph.D.; benavidezb@winthrop.edu; fortnerc@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Political Science

Faculty Mentor

Brandon Ranallo-Benavidez, Ph.D.; Cheryl Fortner-Wood, Ph.D.

Abstract

Compared to their heterosexual peers, sexual minority youth experience higher rates of sexual risk behaviors. Access to comprehensive sexual education is often linked to reduced rates of risky behaviors, however sexual minority students often feel underrepresented in sexual education. Conducting a content analysis of sexual education policies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia, researchers coded policies as neutral, inclusive, or exclusive of sexual minorities. Additionally, policies were analyzed for heteronormativity and heterosexism. Among policies found, most were neutral. There were more exclusive policies than inclusive policies. Among exclusive policies, all were either heteronormative or heterosexist. No neutral or inclusive policies were heteronormative or heterosexist. Using this data and data from sexual behavior subsection of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, I will begin to examine the relationship between policies and sexual behavior in sexual minority youth with an emphasis on condom use, birth control use, and sexual initiation.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

MCNR 300 - Fortner-Wood

Other Presentations/Performances

Ronald E. McNair Scholars Program Virtual Symposium, Rock Hill, SC, June 2020

Type of Presentation

Poster presentation

Start Date

16-4-2021 3:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Sexual Education Policies and Sexual Risk in Sexual Minority Youth

Compared to their heterosexual peers, sexual minority youth experience higher rates of sexual risk behaviors. Access to comprehensive sexual education is often linked to reduced rates of risky behaviors, however sexual minority students often feel underrepresented in sexual education. Conducting a content analysis of sexual education policies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia, researchers coded policies as neutral, inclusive, or exclusive of sexual minorities. Additionally, policies were analyzed for heteronormativity and heterosexism. Among policies found, most were neutral. There were more exclusive policies than inclusive policies. Among exclusive policies, all were either heteronormative or heterosexist. No neutral or inclusive policies were heteronormative or heterosexist. Using this data and data from sexual behavior subsection of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey, I will begin to examine the relationship between policies and sexual behavior in sexual minority youth with an emphasis on condom use, birth control use, and sexual initiation.