Title of Abstract

ACL injuries in female athletes

Poster Number

68

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.; boydj@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

Abstract

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common in any physical activity. As research grows it is known that ACL injuries are two to six times more likely to affect females than males. Focusing on sport related ACL injuries for females they can be non-contact and contact. In addition, a study based on the effects that neuromuscular and hormonal factors show that the two factors can play a major role in the amount of knee injuries a female athlete may have. The studies in this literature review discuss how the injuries happen, and injury prevention programs that focus on the improvement of neuromuscular training. These studies focused on the hormonal difference in females and males, neuromuscular training programs, and extrinsic factors that connected directly to ACL injuries in female athletes. To show hormonal differences, the studies implemented research about male and female ACL injuries and the theories. The neuromuscular training program included the low body extremities that utilized plyometric exercises. The extrinsic factors included type of sport being played and condition of playing surfaces. The studies showed that these factors can make a difference if not properly understood and made aware of. In addition, the knowledge of the differences and factors can be used to create prevention programs that will help enhance performance for female athletes and reduce ACL injuries. These studies show that if the proper health care professionals and coaches can implement different programs and strategies before and after an ACL injury the risk and re-occurrences of the ACL injury can be reduced.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

EXSC 465 - Boyd

Type of Presentation

Poster presentation

Start Date

16-4-2021 3:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

ACL injuries in female athletes

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common in any physical activity. As research grows it is known that ACL injuries are two to six times more likely to affect females than males. Focusing on sport related ACL injuries for females they can be non-contact and contact. In addition, a study based on the effects that neuromuscular and hormonal factors show that the two factors can play a major role in the amount of knee injuries a female athlete may have. The studies in this literature review discuss how the injuries happen, and injury prevention programs that focus on the improvement of neuromuscular training. These studies focused on the hormonal difference in females and males, neuromuscular training programs, and extrinsic factors that connected directly to ACL injuries in female athletes. To show hormonal differences, the studies implemented research about male and female ACL injuries and the theories. The neuromuscular training program included the low body extremities that utilized plyometric exercises. The extrinsic factors included type of sport being played and condition of playing surfaces. The studies showed that these factors can make a difference if not properly understood and made aware of. In addition, the knowledge of the differences and factors can be used to create prevention programs that will help enhance performance for female athletes and reduce ACL injuries. These studies show that if the proper health care professionals and coaches can implement different programs and strategies before and after an ACL injury the risk and re-occurrences of the ACL injury can be reduced.