Title of Abstract

Predictors of Criminal Behavior: Crime Exposure, Childhood Adversity, Discrimination, Parenting Styles, Socioeconomic Status

Poster Number

56

Faculty Mentor

Tara Collins, Ph.D.; collinstj@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Tara Collins, Ph.D.

Abstract

This paper discusses the childhood predictors of criminal behavior. In Study 1, we examined the predictors of childhood exposure to crime, household income, and childhood adversity. In Study 2, we examined additional predictors of crime: parenting styles, experiences of discrimination, and socioeconomic status. Both studies utilized an online survey and samples of college students from a southern university. A correlational research design was used to measure the relationship between parenting styles, racial and socioeconomic discrimination, and socioeconomic status. We created a measure of willingness to commit crime by presenting different crime scenarios and measuring participants’ willingness to participate in the act. In Study 1, we found that crime exposure was a significant positive predictor of willingness to commit crime. The childhood adversity factors of household substance abuse and psychological abuse were also significant positive predictors. In Study 2, we found that experiences of racial and socioeconomic discrimination were significant positive predictors of willingness to commit crimes. The parenting style subscale care was a marginally significant negative predictor, and the subscale overprotection was not significant. There was no significant difference in willingness between people who made less than $50, 000 and those who made more than $50, 000 in both studies. In our conclusion, we will discuss how policies are needed to combat criminal, antisocial, and deviant behavior by providing early interventions that strengthen community sociability. This will address mass incarceration and how Black, Indigenous, and other people of color are disproportionately affected by social constructs in society.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

Please check this if you understand.

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 - Collins & MCNR 300 - Fortner

Other Presentations/Performances

Black Doctoral Network Conference, Virtual, October 2020

Grant Support

McNair Scholars Program, Winthrop University

Start Date

16-4-2021 3:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Predictors of Criminal Behavior: Crime Exposure, Childhood Adversity, Discrimination, Parenting Styles, Socioeconomic Status

This paper discusses the childhood predictors of criminal behavior. In Study 1, we examined the predictors of childhood exposure to crime, household income, and childhood adversity. In Study 2, we examined additional predictors of crime: parenting styles, experiences of discrimination, and socioeconomic status. Both studies utilized an online survey and samples of college students from a southern university. A correlational research design was used to measure the relationship between parenting styles, racial and socioeconomic discrimination, and socioeconomic status. We created a measure of willingness to commit crime by presenting different crime scenarios and measuring participants’ willingness to participate in the act. In Study 1, we found that crime exposure was a significant positive predictor of willingness to commit crime. The childhood adversity factors of household substance abuse and psychological abuse were also significant positive predictors. In Study 2, we found that experiences of racial and socioeconomic discrimination were significant positive predictors of willingness to commit crimes. The parenting style subscale care was a marginally significant negative predictor, and the subscale overprotection was not significant. There was no significant difference in willingness between people who made less than $50, 000 and those who made more than $50, 000 in both studies. In our conclusion, we will discuss how policies are needed to combat criminal, antisocial, and deviant behavior by providing early interventions that strengthen community sociability. This will address mass incarceration and how Black, Indigenous, and other people of color are disproportionately affected by social constructs in society.