Title of Abstract

The Deeper Roots

Submitting Student(s)

Danielle WalkerFollow

Session Title

Creative Expressions-Session 1

Faculty Mentor

Claudia O'Steen, M.F.A.; osteenc@winthrop.edu

College

College of Visual and Performing Arts

Department

Fine Arts

Faculty Mentor

Claudia O'Steen, M.F.A.

Abstract

There is a divide between feminine and masculine roles in African American households. Black men are given male roles and are turned away from anything feminine. Through research, I searched for answers that explain why man wants to act like society’s expected standards of a man. Black men act tough and keep their feelings and experiences with racial discrimination on college campuses hidden, as well as their admiration towards their father’s for being manly role-models. My drawings display the groups of words that highlight statements made by black men. The words capture the viewer’s attention rather than the individual’s faces. The words explain that any man can have the same experience that leads to the development of his masculinity, rather than each individual facing something different. Embracing an African American nineties aesthetic, the words will be spray painted in an array of bright colors and patterns. I use ceramic heads to represent African American men who refuse to express their emotions. I want the viewer to understand what is going on in their minds without him having to open his mouth and speak.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Performance Description

Artist Talk

Start Date

16-4-2021 11:42 AM

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Apr 16th, 11:42 AM

The Deeper Roots

There is a divide between feminine and masculine roles in African American households. Black men are given male roles and are turned away from anything feminine. Through research, I searched for answers that explain why man wants to act like society’s expected standards of a man. Black men act tough and keep their feelings and experiences with racial discrimination on college campuses hidden, as well as their admiration towards their father’s for being manly role-models. My drawings display the groups of words that highlight statements made by black men. The words capture the viewer’s attention rather than the individual’s faces. The words explain that any man can have the same experience that leads to the development of his masculinity, rather than each individual facing something different. Embracing an African American nineties aesthetic, the words will be spray painted in an array of bright colors and patterns. I use ceramic heads to represent African American men who refuse to express their emotions. I want the viewer to understand what is going on in their minds without him having to open his mouth and speak.