Title of Abstract

Food Insecurity and Resiliency Among College Students: A Review of Literature

Poster Number

46

Faculty Mentor

Ashley Licata Ph.D.; licataa@winthrop.edu

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Human Nutrition

Faculty Mentor

Ashley Licata, Ph.D.

Abstract

Food insecurity described as inadequate access to food represents one of the most ubiquitous health disparities of our time. Effecting over 37 million people nationwide, this critical determinant of health has been linked with negative health and social outcomes. College students represent the most at-risk population for food insecurity out of any age group. The purpose of this review is to explore the relationship between food insecure students and their rates of depression, stress, poor sleep quality, lowered GPAs, and risky lifestyle behaviors. Research suggests a positive association between mental illness, social isolation, and unsupportive relationships, and food insecurity risks.

The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated food insecurity levels in the past year leaving underprivileged Americans grappling with the effects of lost jobs and limited resources. College students ages 18-24 have the highest rates of unemployment as a result of the pandemic and they are also ineligible to receive benefits such as SNAP the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. With the increase in first-generation and minority students assimilating into higher education programs, food insecurity is a public health concern now more than ever. Equal opportunity education must be centered on providing support to students through all aspects of earning their degree which includes adequate access to food. Future research should address the relationships between food insecurity levels and social determinants of health in college students. This would enable the development of potential interventions to help mitigate food insecurity in the college student population.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

NUTR 400 - Licata

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:30 PM

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Apr 16th, 12:30 PM

Food Insecurity and Resiliency Among College Students: A Review of Literature

Food insecurity described as inadequate access to food represents one of the most ubiquitous health disparities of our time. Effecting over 37 million people nationwide, this critical determinant of health has been linked with negative health and social outcomes. College students represent the most at-risk population for food insecurity out of any age group. The purpose of this review is to explore the relationship between food insecure students and their rates of depression, stress, poor sleep quality, lowered GPAs, and risky lifestyle behaviors. Research suggests a positive association between mental illness, social isolation, and unsupportive relationships, and food insecurity risks.

The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated food insecurity levels in the past year leaving underprivileged Americans grappling with the effects of lost jobs and limited resources. College students ages 18-24 have the highest rates of unemployment as a result of the pandemic and they are also ineligible to receive benefits such as SNAP the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. With the increase in first-generation and minority students assimilating into higher education programs, food insecurity is a public health concern now more than ever. Equal opportunity education must be centered on providing support to students through all aspects of earning their degree which includes adequate access to food. Future research should address the relationships between food insecurity levels and social determinants of health in college students. This would enable the development of potential interventions to help mitigate food insecurity in the college student population.