Title of Abstract

Intergenerational Transmission of Education Among Parents and Their Children

Poster Number

37

Submitting Student(s)

Kenisha RobinsonFollow

Faculty Mentor

Nicholas Moellman Ph.D.; moellmann@winthrop.edu

College

College of Business Administration

Faculty Mentor

Nicholas Moellman, Ph.D.

Abstract

Differences among the intergenerational transmission of education between parents of differing income levels and their children contributes to rising inequalities in education levels and poverty status. This paper examines the role that intergenerational transmission of education plays on the potential educational attainment and potential poverty status of children in relation to their parents. Access to high quality education has been recognized as a possible method of breaking the cycle of poverty among families. Prior research has examined parental education levels on children in various household settings: such as two parent households, single mothers, and adopted children. The majority of sources find that, while other factors play a role, the education of a parent or guardian does have some effect on children’s educational attainment level and potential poverty status. This paper argues that parents of lower educational attainment translates to lower educational attainment for their children, which makes those children much more likely to be in poverty over their lifetime. To combat these issues, a possible solution is to implement ongoing education programs for parents in poverty to help with increasing educational attainment of those parents.

Additional Fields About Your Abstract

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Course Assignment

ECON 348X - Moellman

Type of Presentation

Poster presentation

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:30 PM

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Apr 16th, 12:30 PM

Intergenerational Transmission of Education Among Parents and Their Children

Differences among the intergenerational transmission of education between parents of differing income levels and their children contributes to rising inequalities in education levels and poverty status. This paper examines the role that intergenerational transmission of education plays on the potential educational attainment and potential poverty status of children in relation to their parents. Access to high quality education has been recognized as a possible method of breaking the cycle of poverty among families. Prior research has examined parental education levels on children in various household settings: such as two parent households, single mothers, and adopted children. The majority of sources find that, while other factors play a role, the education of a parent or guardian does have some effect on children’s educational attainment level and potential poverty status. This paper argues that parents of lower educational attainment translates to lower educational attainment for their children, which makes those children much more likely to be in poverty over their lifetime. To combat these issues, a possible solution is to implement ongoing education programs for parents in poverty to help with increasing educational attainment of those parents.