Event Title

Optimization of Smooth Muscle Cell Culture for Blood Vessel Tissue Engineering

Session Title

STEM and Biomedical Research

Document Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Honors Thesis Committee

Matthew Stern, Ph.D.; Laura Glasscock, Ph.D., and Courtney Guenther, Ph.D.

Description

Over 1.5 million heart attacks occur annually in the United States. Vascular bypass surgery is a viable treatment option; however, grafts used in small-diameter bypass surgeries suffer from limitations. To combat those limitations, additional optimization is needed. Potential solutions include the use of tissue engineered conduits constructed using patient-specific smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). This project tested the effects of 1) uncoated versus collagen-coated culture dishes, 2) different SMC media formulations, and 3) different mixtures of both SMC and EC media to identify optimal culture conditions for human aortic smooth muscle cells prior to and during recellularization of vascular scaffolds. The present study hypothesized that 1) collagen would enhance growth based on its abundance in the ECM, 2) both SMC media formulations tested would increase SMC growth, and 3) mixtures of SMC and EC media with more SMC media would enhance SMC proliferation. A parallel project was conducted using ECs cultured in mixtures of SMC and EC media to determine optimal conditions for simultaneous seeding. Results show that 1) collagen was not a significant enhancer of growth, 2) both types of SMC media promoted SMC growth, and 3) mixtures varied in their effect on SMC proliferation, but a 50:50 mixture showed no negative effect on SMC proliferation after 72 hours. These results indicate that SMCs grow successfully in several conditions, thus providing more leeway for simultaneous seeding of SMCs and ECs. Understanding factors needed to culture SMCs in combination with ECs provides valuable information for vascular tissue engineering.

Previously Presented/Performed?

SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2019; Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), Anaheim, California, November 2019; South Carolina INBRE Science Symposium, Columbia, South Carolina, January 2020; Sixth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2020

Grant Support?

Supported by a grant from the South Carolina EPSCoR/IDeA Developmental Research Program, an SC INBRE grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS), and a Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program grant from the U.S. Department of Education

Awards Won

Third Place, Life Sciences, SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2019

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Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

Optimization of Smooth Muscle Cell Culture for Blood Vessel Tissue Engineering

Over 1.5 million heart attacks occur annually in the United States. Vascular bypass surgery is a viable treatment option; however, grafts used in small-diameter bypass surgeries suffer from limitations. To combat those limitations, additional optimization is needed. Potential solutions include the use of tissue engineered conduits constructed using patient-specific smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). This project tested the effects of 1) uncoated versus collagen-coated culture dishes, 2) different SMC media formulations, and 3) different mixtures of both SMC and EC media to identify optimal culture conditions for human aortic smooth muscle cells prior to and during recellularization of vascular scaffolds. The present study hypothesized that 1) collagen would enhance growth based on its abundance in the ECM, 2) both SMC media formulations tested would increase SMC growth, and 3) mixtures of SMC and EC media with more SMC media would enhance SMC proliferation. A parallel project was conducted using ECs cultured in mixtures of SMC and EC media to determine optimal conditions for simultaneous seeding. Results show that 1) collagen was not a significant enhancer of growth, 2) both types of SMC media promoted SMC growth, and 3) mixtures varied in their effect on SMC proliferation, but a 50:50 mixture showed no negative effect on SMC proliferation after 72 hours. These results indicate that SMCs grow successfully in several conditions, thus providing more leeway for simultaneous seeding of SMCs and ECs. Understanding factors needed to culture SMCs in combination with ECs provides valuable information for vascular tissue engineering.