Event Title

The Representation of Female African American College Students on Television: A Content Analysis of A Different World and Grownish

Session Title

Women's and Gender Studies

Document Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Mass Communication

Honors Thesis Committee

Nathaniel Frederick II, Ph.D.; Emmanuel Nwachukwu, Ph.D.; and Guy Reel, Ph.D.

Description

This research examines the portrayal and representation of the African American female college experience on television sitcoms. A content analysis was conducted on two situational comedy television shows, A Different World and Grownish, coding the comparative aspects of each show to include: the depiction of the female lead, the predominant theme of each episode, resolution of conflict, perceived realism, and overall tone. The study suggests that though Grownish addresses diverse issues faced by millennial students, the portrayal of these issues dilutes the overall message, while A Different World succinctly illustrates the problems students face. Results and implications will be discussed.

Previously Presented/Performed?

SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2019; Sixth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2020

Awards Won

Third Place, Social Sciences, SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2019

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Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

The Representation of Female African American College Students on Television: A Content Analysis of A Different World and Grownish

This research examines the portrayal and representation of the African American female college experience on television sitcoms. A content analysis was conducted on two situational comedy television shows, A Different World and Grownish, coding the comparative aspects of each show to include: the depiction of the female lead, the predominant theme of each episode, resolution of conflict, perceived realism, and overall tone. The study suggests that though Grownish addresses diverse issues faced by millennial students, the portrayal of these issues dilutes the overall message, while A Different World succinctly illustrates the problems students face. Results and implications will be discussed.