Event Title

I Met God and She’s Black: A Perspective in Womanist Theology

Session Title

Women's and Gender Studies

Document Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies

Honors Thesis Committee

Peter Judge, Ph.D.; O. Jennifer Dixon-McKnight, Ph.D.; and Kristin Kiblinger, Ph.D.

Description

Womanism, an emergent voice for African American women, is defined as a social theory based on the history and everyday experiences of black women. The term, first coined by Alice Walker, later led Katie Canon to found a new paradigm of thought for black women’s religious experiences known as Womanist Theology. In this paper, the goal is to define Womanist Theology as a religious conceptual framework that considers, yet revises, traditional practices and interpretations of the Bible to empower and liberate African American women. It will argue, by viewing historically black denominations, that Womanist Theology can be visualized as a colloquy that allows for black women to embrace a religion, a Jesus, a God, and a lifestyle that is free from oppression and suppression of white supremacy and patriarchy. Due to the problems of racism, classism, patriarchy, and sexism, this research will also argue that the Womanist biblical approach provides an adequate solution to the problems of being black, female and Christian in America.

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Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

I Met God and She’s Black: A Perspective in Womanist Theology

Womanism, an emergent voice for African American women, is defined as a social theory based on the history and everyday experiences of black women. The term, first coined by Alice Walker, later led Katie Canon to found a new paradigm of thought for black women’s religious experiences known as Womanist Theology. In this paper, the goal is to define Womanist Theology as a religious conceptual framework that considers, yet revises, traditional practices and interpretations of the Bible to empower and liberate African American women. It will argue, by viewing historically black denominations, that Womanist Theology can be visualized as a colloquy that allows for black women to embrace a religion, a Jesus, a God, and a lifestyle that is free from oppression and suppression of white supremacy and patriarchy. Due to the problems of racism, classism, patriarchy, and sexism, this research will also argue that the Womanist biblical approach provides an adequate solution to the problems of being black, female and Christian in America.