Submitting Student(s)

Zain AndersonFollow

Session Title

STEM and Biomedical Research

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Faculty Mentor

David Schary, Ph.D.

Abstract

As of 2016, hypertension affects 33.2% of adults over 20 years old. Many people know that lifestyle changes, such as increasing physical activity through exercise, can improve their blood pressure. Sadly, more than 80% of adults do not meet the recommended guidelines for weekly aerobic and resistance training activities. People who do not already exercise might struggle with adherence to new, regimented programs, or they might find gyms to be intimidating, unfamiliar places. There is a need to inform this population of how they can improve their blood pressure most effectively without compromising other aspects of their lives. There are many forms of physical activity that can meaningfully improve blood pressure, including the use of hand grippers, aquatic training, and other more traditional forms of aerobic and resistance exercise. There are also passive means of improving blood pressure that do not require the use of pharmaceutical intervention, which can negatively impact an individual’s quality of life. This paper evaluates the efficacy and convenience of different means for improving blood pressure for a general population that does not regularly exercise, with the goal of providing approachable recommendations to get more people physically active while combatting hypertension.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Schary

Start Date

24-4-2020 12:00 AM

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Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

The Efficacy and Convenience of Different Means for Improving Blood Pressure

As of 2016, hypertension affects 33.2% of adults over 20 years old. Many people know that lifestyle changes, such as increasing physical activity through exercise, can improve their blood pressure. Sadly, more than 80% of adults do not meet the recommended guidelines for weekly aerobic and resistance training activities. People who do not already exercise might struggle with adherence to new, regimented programs, or they might find gyms to be intimidating, unfamiliar places. There is a need to inform this population of how they can improve their blood pressure most effectively without compromising other aspects of their lives. There are many forms of physical activity that can meaningfully improve blood pressure, including the use of hand grippers, aquatic training, and other more traditional forms of aerobic and resistance exercise. There are also passive means of improving blood pressure that do not require the use of pharmaceutical intervention, which can negatively impact an individual’s quality of life. This paper evaluates the efficacy and convenience of different means for improving blood pressure for a general population that does not regularly exercise, with the goal of providing approachable recommendations to get more people physically active while combatting hypertension.

 

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