Session Title

Mental Health and Education

Document Type

Oral Presentation

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies

Honors Thesis Committee

Ginger Williams, Ph.D.; Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.; and Courtney Guenther, Ph.D.

Description

As the prevalence of mental health disorders in children rises, the need for integrated support systems and evidence-based practice increases, as well. Psychologists and psychiatrists recognize that childhood is the smartest and most effective time for intervention. Preventing severe and long-lasting mental health symptoms from developing also helps prevent crime, loss of productivity, substance abuse, family instability, and dependence on social services. One in five children in schools has a diagnosable mental health disorder, but about 70 percent of those children don’t ever receive the services they need. So how can parents, educators, and healthcare providers work together to both treat and prevent childhood-onset mental health disorders? The present research combines theories, practices, and other research from the fields of education and psychology to address childhood-onset mental health disorders. Psychology, as a discipline, views early diagnosis and immediate treatment of psychological symptoms as essential to recovery and positive health outcomes, but children often experience limited access to mental health services. Educators tend to focus more on the policy side of this issue, advocating for certified health education programs in every school, nationwide mental health awareness initiatives, and expanded school-based mental health services. This issue can be solved through interdisciplinary collaboration between the fields of education and psychology, both of which provide valuable perspectives. Such a collaboration should focus on implementing school-based mental health resources in both primary and secondary schools, expanding the psychiatric workforce, promoting health educator certification, and advocating for public funding.

Course Assignment

IDVS 490H – Williams

Katya Engalichev IDVS Honors Thesis Spring 2020 FINAL.pdf (148 kB)
Katya Engalichev IDVS Honors Thesis Spring 2020

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

Treating and Preventing Childhood-Onset Mental Health Disorders

As the prevalence of mental health disorders in children rises, the need for integrated support systems and evidence-based practice increases, as well. Psychologists and psychiatrists recognize that childhood is the smartest and most effective time for intervention. Preventing severe and long-lasting mental health symptoms from developing also helps prevent crime, loss of productivity, substance abuse, family instability, and dependence on social services. One in five children in schools has a diagnosable mental health disorder, but about 70 percent of those children don’t ever receive the services they need. So how can parents, educators, and healthcare providers work together to both treat and prevent childhood-onset mental health disorders? The present research combines theories, practices, and other research from the fields of education and psychology to address childhood-onset mental health disorders. Psychology, as a discipline, views early diagnosis and immediate treatment of psychological symptoms as essential to recovery and positive health outcomes, but children often experience limited access to mental health services. Educators tend to focus more on the policy side of this issue, advocating for certified health education programs in every school, nationwide mental health awareness initiatives, and expanded school-based mental health services. This issue can be solved through interdisciplinary collaboration between the fields of education and psychology, both of which provide valuable perspectives. Such a collaboration should focus on implementing school-based mental health resources in both primary and secondary schools, expanding the psychiatric workforce, promoting health educator certification, and advocating for public funding.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.