Session Title

Sustainability, Access, and the Environment

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Anthropology

Abstract

Interactions with Indigenous populations around the world have been, and continue to be, riddled with the remnants of colonialist and imperialist ideals. This can be especially true when considering archaeologists and the modern ancestors of the groups of people they study. There has more recently been a push for more ethical fieldwork methodologies, though they are still not the common practice for archaeological fieldwork. By using more collaborative research methodologies, it is possible to push for change and create a more mutually beneficial research environment. Through the examination of the evolution of interactions with the Maya population living in Guatemala and an investigation into more collaborative methods of archaeological research, this study will determine how to construct a more ethical fieldwork environment for all parties involved. This will provide insight into the next steps that should be taken and possible methods of implementation to remove the stigmas surrounding research and fieldwork for Indigenous communities.

Honors Thesis Committee

Brent Woodfill Ph.D.; Richard Chacon Ph.D.; and Adam Glover Ph.D.

Start Date

24-4-2020 12:00 AM

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Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

Examining the Evolution of Interaction between Researchers and Indigenous Populations: An Investigation of Archaeologists and the Maya

Interactions with Indigenous populations around the world have been, and continue to be, riddled with the remnants of colonialist and imperialist ideals. This can be especially true when considering archaeologists and the modern ancestors of the groups of people they study. There has more recently been a push for more ethical fieldwork methodologies, though they are still not the common practice for archaeological fieldwork. By using more collaborative research methodologies, it is possible to push for change and create a more mutually beneficial research environment. Through the examination of the evolution of interactions with the Maya population living in Guatemala and an investigation into more collaborative methods of archaeological research, this study will determine how to construct a more ethical fieldwork environment for all parties involved. This will provide insight into the next steps that should be taken and possible methods of implementation to remove the stigmas surrounding research and fieldwork for Indigenous communities.

 

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